2021-2022-academic-catalogue

2021/2022

Academic Catalogue

Version: 3.0

Date: Jan 14, 2022

Table of Contents

  1. Who We Are
    1. Our Vision
    2. Our Mission
    3. A Ministry of The Canadian Baptists Of Western Canada
    4. History
    5. Accreditation & Affiliation
    6. What We Believe
    7. Faculty
  2. Carey Theological College Academic Programs
    1. Academic Programs
    2. Learning Outcomes
    3. Program Requirements
      1. Program Requirements Chart
      2. Doctor of Ministry and Advanced Diploma Program Specific Requirements
      3. Master’s Program Specific Requirements
        1. Affirmation of Ministry Review for MDiv Program
      4. Diploma Program Specific Requirements
      5. Accelerated Bachelor’s and Master’s Program Specific Requirements
      6. Occasional Student Program Specific Requirements
      7. Students from Canadian Baptists of Western Canada (CBWC) Churches Anticipating Professional Ministry
    4. Course Descriptions
  3. Graduation Requirements
    1. Additional Graduation Requirements for Doctor of Ministry
    2. Additional Graduation Requirements for Master’s Programs
  4. Financial Information
    1. Tuition and Fees
    2. Payment, Late Payment, and Outstanding Accounts
    3. Changes of Registration, Withdrawal and Refunds
      1. Tax Receipts
  5. Student Financial Aid
    1. Student Assistance, Scholarships
    2. Student Awards
    3. Applying for Student Assistance
  6. Admissions
    1. Program Admission Requirements
      1. Accelerated Bachelor’s and Master’s Program Admission Requirements
      2. Doctor of Ministry and Advanced Diploma Program Admission Requirements
    2. General Admission Requirements and Process
    3. Key Admission Dates
    4. Language Requirements for Admissions
    5. Student Classification
      1. Regular Program Students
      2. Full Time Student Designation
      3. Inactive Students & Leave of Absence
      4. Unclassified and Visiting Students
      5. Undeclared Student Status
      6. Mature Student Status
      7. Continuing Education Credit Registration (CBWC)
      8. International Students
    6. Transfer Credits, Shared Credits, Advanced Standing and Exemptions
      1. Transfer Credits
      2. Shared Credit
      3. Advanced Standing with Credit
      4. Exemption
  7. Course Registration
  8. Assessment and Grading
    1. Grading Scale: Diplomas, Masters Programs
    2. Grading Scale: Advanced Diplomar and Doctor of Ministry
    3. Grade Changes
    4. Extensions
    5. Academic Probation
    6. Repeated Courses
  9. Academic Integrity
    1. Plagiarism
    2. Research Ethics
    3. Academic Appeals
  10. Student Life
    1. General
    2. Guidelines for online discussions (netiquette)
    3. Accountability and Disciplinary Procedures
  11. Institutional Integrity
    1. Gender Language
    2. Non-Academic Grievance Matters
    3. Discrimination and Harassment Policy
    4. Privacy Policy
  12. Student Resources
    1. ID Cards
    2. Student Data Systems Access (Populi)
    3. UBC Learning Management System Access (Canvas)
    4. Traditional Library Services
    5. Online Library Resources
    6. Textbooks
    7. Academic Advising

Who We Are

Our Vision

Our vision is to empower faithful Christian leaders for every generation, culture, and community.

Our Mission

Our mission is to re-imagine Christian discipleship by – Delivering contextualized theological education – Building faith, character, and competency in students – Resourcing churches and agencies to advance their mission – Developing sustainable partnerships for our shared vision

A Ministry of The Canadian Baptists Of Western Canada

Carey Theological College is a valued resource of the Canadian Baptists of Western Canada (https://cbwc.ca/). The influence of the College extends far beyond its denominational home, as it prepares persons for the role of professional ministry, and equips laypersons for effective leadership and service.

History

Carey Hall was established in 1959 by the Province of British Columbia under the Carey Hall Act. The Convention of Baptist Churches of BC is the organizing body of Carey Hall. Carey began operations in the summer of 1960 as a Christian witness and residence for 42 undergraduate men on the UBC campus. In 1975, a foundation for a graduate school was initiated, which led to the establishment of a Baptist graduate college in June, 1980. The Carey residences became co-ed in 1985, and continue to provide a Christian community for UBC students on campus. The college offered graduate, doctoral, and continuing-education programs of study. In 1991 the residence and college were separated and renamed as Carey Theological College and Carey Centre. Carey Institute was established in 2006 to fill an educational gap for people wanting to further their theological education and leadership skills through non-traditional means. Carey Institute hosted workshops, seminars, dialogues, skill-building, mission experiences, and short media presentations. Carey Institute also used traditional course formats and culturally contextualized theological education to prepare and equip spiritually maturing persons to integrate theological commitment with life in professional and lay ministry. In 2017, Carey adopted a new strategic plan that brings together the passion, skills and expertise of our staff and faculty to be known as one entity; Carey Theological College. As an accredited academic institution grounded in Christ-centred, biblically-faithful, and missions-focussed Christian leadership, Carey continues to be committed to offering world-class theological degrees and Christian discipleship training to the whole family of God.

Accreditation & Affiliation

Carey Theological College is evangelical and utterly committed to Jesus Christ and His gospel. Doctrinally, it takes its position in the mainstream of evangelical Protestantism. It is committed to the historic, orthodox teachings of Christianity as revealed in the Scriptures. This theological position allows for working relationships with various churches and para-church ministries, demonstrating openness while remaining true to the Baptist community. Carey is a graduate theological college and holds a charter from the Province of British Columbia to grant graduate theological degrees. Carey holds the Education Quality Assurance (EQA) designation, indicating that it meets or exceeds quality assurance standards set by the province of B.C. Carey is also accredited by the Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada (www.ats.edu). The following degree programs are ATS-approved:
  • Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.)
  • Master of Divinity (M.Div.)
  • Master of Pastoral Ministry (MPM)
  • Master of Arts in Spiritual Formation (MASF)
  • Master of Arts in Christian Ministry (MACM)
Carey Theological College is committed to credible academic scholarship and strives to maintain a high level of education in graduate ministry training. Carey is approved for a Comprehensive Distance Education Program, and is authorized to offer the MACM, MPM, and MDiv in a fully-online format. ATS Commission contact information is: Commission on Accrediting of the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada 10 Summit Park Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15275 USA Telephone: 412-788-6505 Fax: 412-788-6510 www.ats.edu Carey is affiliated with the University of British Columbia (www.ubc.ca) and has access to many of UBC’s facilities. Affiliation with UBC means that certain criteria must be met by Carey Theological College, but it does not mandate any scrutiny or approval of course offerings by the UBC Senate. Carey’s programs are subject to continuous approval of the Carey Senate.

What We Believe

We accept wholeheartedly the revelation of God given in the scriptures of the Old and New Testaments and confess the faith therein set forth. We here explicitly assert the doctrines which we regard as crucial to the understanding and proclamation of the Gospel and to practical Christian living:
  1. The sovereignty, love, and grace of God, the Father, the Son and Holy Spirit in creation, providence, revelation, redemption and final judgment.
  2. The divine inspiration of Holy Scripture and its entire trustworthiness and supreme authority in all matters of faith and conduct.
  3. The value of each human being as created by God. The universal sinfulness of humankind since the fall, which alienates all from God and subjects all to condemnation.
  4. The full deity and humanity of the Lord Jesus Christ, the incarnate Son of God, whose substitutionary sacrifice is the sole ground of redemption from the guilt, penalty and power of sin.
  5. The justification of the sinner by the grace of God through faith alone in Christ crucified and risen from the dead.
  6. The illuminating, regenerating, indwelling and sanctifying work of God, the Holy Spirit, in the believer.
  7. The church as set forth in the New Testament and understood historically by the Baptist community.
  8. The expectation of the personal, visible return of the Lord Jesus Christ, our participation in the resurrection, and the hope of eternal life.
(Cf. the CBWC Statement of Faith, https://cbwc.ca/about/#statement-of-faith)

Faculty

Simply called “Faculty” in the Carey Hall Act (1959), Core Faculty are responsible for instruction, program and curriculum development, student formation, research and publication, and service to the college and to the larger church. Core Faculty hold the ranks of Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor or (Full) Professor. They provide academic leadership for the College.

Unlike Core Faculty, Special Faculty do participate variously in components of the academic life of Carey Theological College, but they do not share in the overall responsibility for instruction, program and curriculum development, student formation, research and publication, and service to the College and to the wider church. Special faculty are not members of Senate or voting members of faculty committees.

The Special Faculty position of Professors of Practice is reserved for practitioners in relevant fields in ministry with a minimum of 20 years of professional experience related to the field of teaching and being widely recognized by one’s peers.

Adjunct Faculty are Special Faculty who are invited to teach or co-teach regularly in subject areas or courses that supplement the expertise of the Carey Core Faculty. They may be responsible for academic activities related to the ongoing educational programming of the College, such as teaching, student supervision, mentorship, or any combination of the above.

The Special Faculty position of Visiting Instructor may be offered to faculty members from other theological education institutions who join the teaching community of Carey Theological College for a limited period during their sabbatical or leave.

Sessional Instructors are Special Faculty who have been hired to teach a specific course or courses within the academic curriculum.

The Special Faculty position of Affiliate Faculty is granted to a person who has a track record for teaching and research and may maintain a record of academic, pastoral or missionary service through their involvement at other institutions. Affiliate Faculty may support the teaching mission of Carey Theological College through targeted research projects, the creation of Carey learning resources for students and churches, student supervision for guided studies, capstone projects, or doctoral thesis projects.

Upon recommendation of the Core Faculty, the President, the Chair of the Board of Administration and the Senate, an appointment to the position of Professor Emeritus may be made by the Board of a retiring faculty member having a lengthy and meritorious record of service to Carey and demonstrating an ongoing commitment to the educational mission and strategic direction of the College.

The position of Visiting Scholar or Research Fellow may be offered to current or retired faculty members from other theological education institutions or independent Christian researchers who are invited to contribute to Carey’s targeted institutional research and development projects.

Courtesy Faculty are Special Faculty who serve on a volunteer basis and may participate in teaching, research, and student formation.

For a list of our active faculty, please visit our website (https://carey-edu.ca/about/faculty/)

Carey Theological College Academic Programs

Academic Programs

Carey offers degree programs at the masters and doctoral level, as well as diploma programs for graduate students.

Program

Credit Hours

Degree Required

Doctoral Study

Doctor of Ministry (D.Min.): an advanced degree for experienced pastoral leaders, designed to enhance leadership skills and theological reflection.

30

MDiv 

(3.3 GPA)

Advanced Diploma: a program of continuing education in a specialized area of study, for pastoral leaders who have completed an appropriate masters degree.

18

Master’s Degree

(2.7 GPA)

Master’s Level Study

Master of Divinity (M.Div.): the standard seminary program for preparing pastoral leaders, provides a thorough foundation of biblical, theological, and ministry studies for pastoral leadership.

72

Bachelor’s

Degree

(2.7 GPA)

Master of Pastoral Ministry (MPM): a compressed pastoral training degree covers essential biblical, theological, ministry subjects, to make ministry training accessible.

48

Bachelor’s

Degree

(2.7 GPA)

Master of Arts in Christian Ministry (MACM): a theological-integration degree for Christian leaders, offers theological training with a focus on integration for relevance in specific ministry contexts. Specializations are available for various ministry contexts and areas of focus.

48

Bachelor’s

Degree

(2.7 GPA)

MASF – Master of Arts in Spiritual Formation: a degree focusing on spiritual growth and leadership nurtures personal spiritual formation, provides skills and tools to lead others in spiritual formation.

48

Bachelor’s

Degree

(2.7 GPA)

Diploma in Biblical Studies (DBS): a program that provides for a strong foundation in Biblical studies including exegesis, hermeneutics and languages as well as its practical applications.

24

Bachelor’s

Degree

(2.7 GPA)

Diploma in Christian Ministry (DCM): a program of study for growth and development of ministry competencies. Nurtures personal and spiritual growth, theological understanding, skills for more effective ministry.

24

Bachelor’s

Degree

(2.7 GPA)

Diploma in Spiritual Formation (DSF): a Biblically-based program that provides a variety of learning experiences that involves instruction and reflection, thoughtful practice and spiritual companionship, service and prayer. It is for all who want to move from simply wanting a life with God to learning to live it.

24

Bachelor’s

Degree

(2.7 GPA)

Accelerated Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees

Partnerships have been established for accelerated Bachelor’s and Master’s degree programs with Prairie Bible College (PBC).  


Bachelor’s programs include:

Bachelor of Arts in Ministry (PBC)


Combined with Master’s programs at Carey:

Master of Divinity

Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry

Master of Arts in Christian Ministry

Master of Arts in Spiritual Formation





96



48

32

32

32




Consult with individual institution


Three years of a Bachelor’s program

(3.0 GPA)

Occasional Student Program

Occasional Student Program allows potential students to be admitted into Carey through a streamlined process and take up to 9 credits of study.  

Maximum 9

Ability to keep up with the course work

Learning Outcomes

Carey’s learning outcomes are common for all programs and degrees but the extent to which each degree or program meets these learning outcomes varies depending on the focus and academic rigour of the program or degree.

The common learning outcomes include the following:

  1. Articulate the foundational biblical content of both Old and New Testaments, including their original cultural and historical context.

  2. Articulate the effective application of evangelical hermeneutical tools to the Old and New Testaments, producing effective preaching and teaching for the church in its multigenerational context and multicultural mission.

  3. Articulate the major doctrines of the Christian faith (content), including their biblical basis, historical context, denominational significance and cultural relevance today.

  4. Identify sustainable spiritual practices and character qualities for Christian ministry in areas such as spiritual formation, evangelism, administration, teaching, counselling and worship for service in the Canadian Baptist (or equivalent) tradition.

  5. Demonstrate ministry competency and their application through self understanding, interpersonal skills, community leadership, and an articulation of Christian leadership vocation and ethic in the Canadian Baptist (or equivalent) tradition.

Archiving Student Assignments for Assessment Purposes

All ATS-accredited schools must perform an annual assessment of our educational effectiveness. This includes evaluating the success of our student body in accomplishing program learning outcomes, by reviewing a selection of assignments submitted by students.

Schools are expected to keep an archive of sample materials as documentation for their findings. Student assignments used as assessment artifacts are: (a) used solely for internal assessment purposes; (b) reviewed only by faculty and/or authorized staff on the assessment team; (c) privately and securely stored; and (d) referenced anonymously as part of cumulative data gathered from multiple sources. They are not: (e) made public; (f) identified individually or by name in Carey’s assessment reports; or (g) used for purposes other than that of assessment without the express permission of the student.

We recognize that some assignments contain information that is personal by nature, and we are careful to respect the dignity and privacy of students in any use of submitted materials, whether for grading or assessment. Students who have any questions or concerns about the evaluation or archiving of materials are welcome to discuss them with the Registrar’s Office.

Program Requirements

Carey’s programs are designed to enable students to enter as a diploma, master’s, or doctoral student and to easily continue their studies to the next program level. For example, a student may enter Carey as a Diploma in Christian Ministry student then apply the courses they have taken and continue into the Master’s of Christian Ministry program and continue further into the Master’s of Divinity program and still further into an Advanced Diploma and finally a Doctor of Ministry program. Each subsequent entry to the next program requires all admissions requirements to be fulfilled. The following chart summarizes the program requirements for each degree and how a student may advance from one program to another.

Program Requirements Chart

Doctor of Ministry and Advanced Diploma Program Specific Requirements

All students will begin their Doctor of Ministry program by enrolling in the Advanced Diploma program. The Advanced Diploma program is composed of the coursework for the Doctor of Ministry program thereby enabling the student to opt to exit the program after their coursework and be awarded an Advanced Diploma. Should the student wish to continue to complete the Doctor of Ministry of program, they will complete the 12 credits related to their thesis and defence.

All Doctor of Ministry students will be assigned a Faculty Advisor who will walk with them throughout their program and give them advice, support and academic mentorship. The Faculty Advisor will provide academic advising to the student while the Office of the Registrar will provide program administrative support. Faculty Advisors may not necessarily become the Doctor of Ministry student’s thesis supervisor depending on the topic being proposed.

Students in the DMin Program are required to maintain a minimum B + average or better. Students in the Advanced Diploma Program are required to maintain a minimum B average or better. Students in the Advanced Diploma Program who wish to enter the Doctor of Ministry Program will need to graduate with a minimum B + average or better. If a student achieves final course grades below B in 3 courses, or fails to complete 3 courses in the specified time frame, that student will be placed on Academic Probation.

Clinical Pastoral Education: Doctoral students will be permitted to present one advanced unit from an accredited CPE program for six credits towards the D.Min. program. The units must not have been credited as part of an M.Div. program of studies. The unit may be taken as part of the D.Min. program.

The normal completion timeline for the D.Min. program is 4-5 years. The limit for completion of all requirements for the degree shall be six (6) years. Any extension must be approved by vote of the faculty. Annually, the Faculty Advisor, shall require each student to report on his/her progress in the program. Students who enter with advanced standing will be expected to complete their studies in a shorter period of time. A written statement will be given to the student at the time of acceptance.

Master’s Program Specific Requirements

Students in all Master’s degree programs are required to maintain a minimum B- average or will be placed on Academic Probation.

Affirmation of Ministry Review for MDiv Program

Theological schools are conscious that the completion of an M.Div. or other seminary degree does not, in itself, suffice to equip an individual for effective Christian ministry. Preparation to serve as a ministry leader involves a multi-dimensional mix of calling, gifting, equipping, affirming, collaborating, and other aspects of an individual’s life, encompassing the academic, spiritual, personal, social, and vocational. With this in mind, the Carey ministry-focused masters degrees include a process of discernment which engages faculty, students, and others of the course of a student’s degree program. The aim of this process is to identify and encourage the student’s gifts for ministry, to enrich his/her preparation for a lifetime of faithful and joyful ministry, and to formally express the school’s conviction that this student is truly called and equipped to move into the next stage of ministry in a way that extends beyond the mere completion of the academic degree.

The Affirmation for Ministry process begins in conjunction with admission, which includes an admission interview or video where attention focuses on the student’s call to and preparation for ministry. Both the student and the student’s referees are asked to identify areas of strength and weakness that will require attention during the student’s education.

The Carey faculty recognize that ministry is empowered by grace and that readiness for ministry is different for each student, but this recognition accompanies the conviction that readiness for ministry also entails commitment, discipline and excellence. Suitability for ministry is also part of the discernment process and the faculty reserves the right to withhold affirmation if a student is considered to be unfit or unsuitable for ministry.

The granting of the Affirmation for Ministry designation is not a formal requirement for graduation from the MDiv program; a student who completes the degree requirements will graduate even if Affirmation is withheld at this time. The review process, with its relevant reflection and feedback exercises, is a requirement of the program. Where granted, Affirmation for Ministry is noted in the graduating student’s records.

Diploma Program Specific Requirements

All courses need to be successfully completed with a minimum 2.70 GPA (B-) throughout the program of study. Students who fail to maintain the minimum GPA will be put on probation.

Accelerated Bachelor’s and Master’s Program Specific Requirements

Students are required to complete the balance of the required courses as outlined in the respective Master’s program in the Program Requirements Chart that are not provided advanced standing with credit under the admission requirements and meet all Master’s program requirements. Depending on the partner institution offering the complementary Bachelor’s program, the student will be able to apply courses taken at the Master’s level with Carey to satisfy the requirements for the Bachelor’s program. Please consult with the partner institution for their specific Bachelor’s degree requirements. Students will receive their Bachelor’s and Master’s degree diplomas independently each from the partner institution and Carey.

Occasional Student Program Specific Requirements

The Occasional Student Program is intended for potential students to “test the waters” before committing to a formal program of study or to allow potential students to enter the term and begin their studies in anticipation for their formal program application to be reviewed and approved.

The Occasional Student Program enables a student to take up to three courses (maximum two courses per term). Students must demonstrate the ability to maintain their academic performance by achieving a B- (2.7 GPA) during their status as an Occasional Student.

Students from Canadian Baptists of Western Canada (CBWC) Churches Anticipating Professional Ministry

Students who wish to be placed with Canadian Baptists of Western Canada churches or its ministries, or who wish to apply to Canadian Baptist Ministries, should identify themselves on the application form. The Office of the Registrar will provide further and current information regarding the process toward recognition as a ‘Ministerial Candidate’ (as well as validation for assistance from student aid funds).

Course Descriptions

Proposed Course # and Name

Description

BIBL 501

Old Testament I

This course explores genres and literary features, socio-historical contexts, theological themes and purposes of the Torah and Former Prophets while considering how these Scriptures continue to speak to us today.

BIBL 502

Old Testament II

This course situates ancient Israel’s Latter Prophets and Sacred Writings within the Old Testament canon, examines the importance of these texts in characterizing and responding to religious and political crises, discusses their multiple genres, highlights key theological themes and exegetical significance for ministry. 

BIBL 511

New Testament I

This course introduces the four canonical Gospels and Acts, with particular attention to their social and historical contexts, distinct literary qualities, theological witness, and formative power for Christian faith and practice. 

BIBL 512

New Testament II

This course introduces the letters of the New Testament and Revelation, with particular attention to their social and historical contexts, literary qualities, theological witness, and formative power for Christian faith and practice. 

HIST 501

Church History I 

This course surveys the history of Christianity from the end of the New Testament era to the end of the Medieval church period. Students will gather historical insights and apply them to contemporary church issues and ministry situations.

HIST 502

Church History II 

This course surveys the history of Christianity from the Age of Reform to the Modern church period until 1950. Students will gather historical insights and apply them to contemporary church issues and ministry situations.

THEO 501

Christian Thought I

This course introduces the study of Christian theology, and explores the Bible’s teaching concerning God’s self-revelation, His nature and activity, together with the person and work of Christ and of the Holy Spirit. 

THEO 502

Christian Thought II

This course introduces the study of Christian theology, and explores the creation and fallen nature of the human race, God’s provision of salvation, the identity and task of the church, and the Bible’s perspective on the ultimate future of the individual and of creation.

APPL 801

Guided Peer-Learning for Ministry 1

This course is part of the field education requirement designed for students who are engaged in active ministry. Students will engage in critical theological reflection on real life issues pertaining to their particular ministry contexts. An experienced pastoral mentor or faculty member will walk alongside the students in this peer learning journey.

APPL 802

Guided Peer-Learning for Ministry 2

In this course you will design and develop a major project in a subject area that serves your interests and ministry needs. This project will be a summative exercise appropriate to your degree program, integrating relevant research, biblical and theological reflection, critical thinking and problem-solving, contextual application, and effective presentation. This course is normally  taken in the final year of your Masters Degree at Carey.

APPL 620/920

Pastoral Care in Today’s Church

The course will survey the broad biblical, theological and practical foundations critical to the task of pastoral ministry, and will provide you with skills to apply what you learn in ministry and community settings.

APPL 602/902

Advanced Preaching & Communication in a Digital Age

This course is designed to provide the student with essential tools for crafting and delivering expository sermons to the contemporary church.

APPL 641/941

Discipleship & Education

This course is a guide for re-imagining the educational mission of the church. Traditional and contemporary educational practices will be assessed biblically and theologically as they apply to Christian formation.

APPL 601/901

Interpersonal skills & conflict resolution

This course will help students to develop the “soft skills” of interpersonal management, emotional intelligence, conflict resolution, and leading teams. 

APPL 600/900

Leadership & Administration

This course will draw upon biblical theology, Christian ethics, and current leadership theory and practice, to help students reflect upon and deliberate leadership skills in their own context. 

APPL 660/960

Spiritual Formation: Theology & Praxis

This course lays a foundation to the theological understanding of spiritual formation through a variety of practices including scriptural reflection, journaling, retreat, art activities and acts of mercy. 

BIBL 600/900

Biblical Interpretation: Theory & Craft

This course supplies a foundation for lifelong study, interpretation, and application of the Christian Scriptures, particularly for vocations of Christian ministry. It includes an overview of principles of biblical interpretation and exposure to resources available to aid interpretation.

THEO 600/900

Christian Ethics

This course will help you to gain an understanding of the philosophical, biblical, and theological bases for personal and social morality, and to develop competence in thoughtful moral decision-making in a Christian framework. A number of selected contemporary ethical issues will be discussed.

BIBL 591

Hebrew 1

This course comprises the first half of a two-quarter introduction to biblical Hebrew. It includes exposure to grammar, vocabulary, and pronunciation as aids for engaging the biblical text and understanding its possible meaning(s). Students will develop the ability to read and translate simple Hebrew sentences from the Old Testament. They will also become familiar with a variety of resources that can enhance study of the Scripture in its original language, including critical editions, lexicons, grammars, commentaries, online resources, and bible software.

BIBL 592

Hebrew 2

This course continues the study of biblical Hebrew, bringing students to one-year competency level. Includes increased confidence in reading and pronunciation, familiarity with most Hebrew verbal forms and their usages, and memorization of Hebrew vocabulary. Students will translate passages of increasing size and difficulty, gain experience using translation aids, and apply acquired knowledge in Hebrew and translation tools to study of Old Testament texts. Prerequisite: Hebrew 1 or equivalent.

BIBL 593

Greek 1

This course introduces students to Koine Greek, the language of the New Testament. It assumes no prior knowledge. 

BIBL 594

Greek 2

This course continues the study of biblical Greek, bringing students to one-year competency level. Students will translate passages of increasing size and difficulty, gain experience using translation aids, and apply acquired knowledge in Greek and translation tools to the study of the New Testament. Prerequisite: Greek 1 or equivalent.

BIBL 630-665/930-965 or BIBL 899

OT Bible elective or Special Topics in OT

An in-depth examination of one Old Testament book or selection of Old Testament texts organized according to theme or interpretive method. 

BIBL 666-686/966-986 or BIBL 899

NT Bible elective or Special Topics in NT

An in-depth examination of one New Testament book or selection of New Testament texts organized according to theme or interpretive method. 

HIST 550

Baptist Identity

This course assists you in becoming an effective leader within the context of Baptist churches in western Canada by augmenting your understanding of, and appreciation for the contribution to Christ’s church made by the world-wide family of believers called “the Baptists.”

HIST 650/950

History of Christian Spirituality

This course will explore significant figures, writings, and themes that contributed to the development of the Christian spiritual tradition from the New Testament time until the present day.

HIST 651/951

History of Christian Thought

A study of the life and thought of selected influential figures from church history, from the apostolic age to the present, in light of broader social and theological settings in which they took place. We will discuss individual contributions in light of the broader social and theological settings in which they took place, and will consider practical lessons that can be applied to our own spheres of service.

HIST 652/952

Faith Storytelling and Intergenerational Formation

This course introduces intergenerational storytelling for families and congregations as a way to  identify the footprints of God in our lives. To achieve this, students will develop skills in the use of historical records, both written and oral, as they document the spiritual legacy present in their families and communities. 

HIST 660/960

History of the Chinese Church

An overview of the development of Christianity in China from the 8th to early 20th century with special attention given to cross-cultural dynamics between the interaction of Christianity and Chinese culture. 

HIST 661/961

The Chinese Canadian Church

This course will explore the history of Chinese immigrant congregations in Canada, including discussion of racial discrimination, transnationalism, satellite households, intergenerational dynamics and the intersection of Chinese and Western value systems. Students are given the opportunity to reflect theologically on the Chinese Christian story and articulate ministry implications for their families and communities.

THEO 500

Doctrinal heritage of the Church

This course surveys the central Christian doctrines as set forth in the biblical message and taught in the church throughout its history, and views them in the context of the contemporary world in which God calls us to live and minister. The course seeks to help participants develop expertise as theologically informed Christian ministers who can connect stated beliefs with life and ministry.

THEO 610/910

Theological issues in the 21st century

This course will explore a selection of current theological issues under discussion today. 

THEO 611/911

Gender Roles in Christian Ministry

This course will guide you through a careful biblical and theological study of the roles of men and women in ministry, equipping you to draw your own informed, exegetically-grounded conclusions on this issue. It will also explore practical strategies to help the church leader guide his or her congregation through the issue in a constructive manner.

THEO 612/912

Pluralism & Post Modernism

This course will explore the shape, foundations, and impact of contemporary pluralistic and postmodern worldviews, especially as these affect the life and ministry of the church. 

THEO 627/927

Contemporary Theologies

This course will examine and evaluate major theological developments that have shaped the Christian world in recent generations.

THEO 601/901

Apologetics

This course will examine the issues involved in defending and presenting Christian theism, considering noteworthy apologetic strategies and classic arguments for the Christian faith. We will explore practical ways these ideas can help us to engage men and women who embrace other world religions and non-Christian worldviews. 

THEO 602/902

World Religions

This course provides a basic understanding of Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism, and Taoism. The course evaluates their impact on both Canadian Society and world affairs and develops a strategy for witnessing to the adherents of these non-Christian religions.

THEO 603/903

Gospel in a Multicultural Multiethnic World

This course introduces you to the perspectives and skills needed for effective ministry in intercultural contexts, with a focus on communication and conflict resolution. It also includes a brief survey of major religions and the challenges these present to communicating the Christian message

THEO 669/969

Spiritual Gifts in the NT and the Church

In this course you will engage in a thorough, in-depth biblical and theological study of the Spirit’s gifts for ministry, developing an overall theology of spiritual gifts and considering strategies to promote effective gift-based ministry in your context.

APPL 642/942

Worship: Theology & Praxis

This course examines the biblical, theological and historical foundations of Christian worship and evaluates some of its contemporary expressions. Students will gain competency in taking a leadership role in Sunday services, baptisms and the Lord’s Supper. 

APPL 621/921

Pastoral Counselling

This course helps students to understand and implement the methods and practices of pastoral counselling.

APPL 640/940

Congregational & Community Formation

This course examines adult Christian education in view of the shifting ways that adults understand truth, religious belief, commitment and community.

APPL 622/922

Pastoral Life: Calling, Identity, Ethics

The purpose of this course is to assist students in discerning their call to vocational pastoral ministry and to explore with them the essential spiritual, familial, personality, emotional and character issues that enable a lifetime of faithful and enjoyable Christian service.

APPL 643/943

Mission & Evangelism

This is an in-depth biblical, theological, and historical exploration of the nature of the Church, the Gospel and our participation in the all-encompassing mission of God in the world.

APPL 661/961

Awakening the Inward Journey

Christian discipleship involves the practice of personal spiritual practices that deepen the believer’s life with God. This course examines the biblical basis of spiritual formation and how it has been practiced in Christian history, with the goal of encouraging spiritual disciplines and rhythms which can sustain a lifetime of Christian service.

APPL 662/962

Living in the Outward Journey

This course explores a biblical and theological foundation for Christian living as an outward movement of the Spirit, including practices of personal and community discernment which lead to ministry and service opportunities in the church and its witness to the world. 

APPL 663/963

Spiritual Direction

This course is designed to give the student an overview of the gift of spiritual direction in the church. Emphasis will be placed on providing a theological and historical context for this ministry, understanding the scope of spiritual direction, and relating this gift to ministry within the body of Christ.

APPL 664/964

Leading Spiritual Formation

This course provides guidance on how to design, implement, assess and reflect on spiritual formation initiatives. The focus of this course will be to lead spiritual formation ministries in a congregational context.

APPL 665/965

Spiritual Practices 

This course surveys the development and theological foundation of spiritual practices in the congregation from both the biblical tradition and Christian history. Students will have the opportunity to engage with and reflect upon spiritual practices for personal and congregational growth.

APPL 666/966

Spiritual Formation and the Church

Spiritual formation begins with the transforming grace of Jesus Christ in individual lives expressed in one’s love and relationship with one another. This course will explore the meaning and expressions of spiritual formation in the context of Christian community biblically, historically and theologically as well as helping students to develop practical skills for spiritual listening and mentoring for nurturing mature spiritual friendships specifically in the context of the church. 

APPL 667/967

Spiritual Formation Through the Arts

This course explores the arts as a discipline and expression for spiritual formation for individuals and for the Church. Students will be given opportunities to reflect theologically and look afresh at the intersection between the biblical salvation narrative and their personal spiritual journey through the practice of arts. Students will also have the opportunity to design art projects for worship and community formation.

DMIN 901

Research Writing  and Proposal

This course is designed to help you prepare to research, write, and defend your Doctor of Ministry thesis project—and more broadly, to engage effectively in the ministry of Christian scholarship. We will consider the role of scholarship in the context of church ministry, and will discuss practical principles, resources, and techniques that may assist you as you plan and pursue your own doctoral project. You will construct and submit a viable project proposal as part of the course. 

Prerequisites:  18 hours of doctoral study and full admission to the DMin program; completion of all relevant doctoral research seminars.

DMIN 902

Thesis Project

A DMin project is a professional project that integrates theological reflection, scholarly research, and practical ministry. The project offers students the opportunity to integrate practice and theory through the engagement of specific projects within the context of the student’s ministerial practice, and to produce a written reflection which draws on relevant scholarly literature to interpret it. The final product will contribute to the enhancement of ministry in both one’s own ministry context and the larger church. 

Graduation Requirements

Graduation from any of Carey’s programs requires the following.

  1. Complete the required number of credit hours of study for the relevant program.

  2. Minimum GPA required for the program of study

Program of StudyMinimum Average GPA
Doctor of Ministry3.30 GPA (B+)
Advanced Diploma3.00 GPA (B)
Master’s Degrees2.70 GPA (B-)
Diploma Program2.70 GPA (B-)
  1. In compliance with all academic policies and student code of conduct set forth in this Academic Catalogue.

  2. All accounts payable and due with Carey Theological College and Carey Hall are paid in full.

  3. Senate approval before graduation.

Students may apply for graduation every semester to receive official transcripts and the graduation diploma. Graduation application forms must be completed and submitted 1 month before the end of the student’s graduating term.

Additional Graduation Requirements for Doctor of Ministry

Preparation of the Doctoral Thesis Project Proposal: DMIN 901 Research Writing and Proposal is designed to assist DMin students to prepare their final project proposal. The research writing component establishes the foundational basis for the Doctoral Thesis Project and is developed as part of the Doctoral Thesis Project under the supervision of the Faculty Advisor and/or DMin Project Supervisor.

Candidacy: Once a student has completed the required courses (under the Advanced Diploma program) and their doctoral thesis project proposal has been presented and accepted, a candidacy evaluation will be conducted. On successful recommendation, the student enters the candidacy phase of the Doctor of Ministry program.

Doctoral Thesis Project: The intent of the doctoral thesis project is to demonstrate advanced competence in the field of ministry and to contribute knowledge to the better understanding of ministry. The integrative method practiced in the theological reflection courses is brought to bear upon an area of ministry in which the DMin student is actively engaged. The Doctoral Thesis Project normally features an articulated ministry problem or question, a Doctoral Thesis Project plan of research and investigation, and theological reflection on the project and evaluation of the DMin student’s own leadership. The candidate is required to present this doctoral thesis project in a form which allows for its circulation among a wider audience and/or academic community. Anyone wishing to use formats other than a thesis style must seek approval from the Research Ethics & Thesis Committee. The thesis shall be examined by a committee of three: the supervisor, a second reader (internal; usually a Core Faculty member), and an external reader. Successful completion of the examination is an essential element in completion of the thesis project.

Upon successful completion of the thesis defense, DMin students are required to provide the Office of the Registrar with 2 bound copies of the finalized thesis for inclusion in the Carey thesis archives.

DMin students who wish to obtain their own doctoral gowns must arrange to purchase or rent them in time for the graduation ceremony. Gown guidelines are available from the Registrar.

THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY THESIS PROJECT: OVERVIEW

The Doctoral Thesis Project represents the final stage of the Doctor of Ministry program. Unlike many other pieces of academic writing, the Doctoral Thesis Project is both a researched academic piece of writing as well as being experiential in character, bringing academic research into conversation with ethnographic research into contemporary ministry context. With the guidance and counsel of faculty advisers, it is a reflective analysis of a well-defined project of ministry undertaken by the minister and is intended to make a contribution to the body of knowledge about the work of ministry.

A successful Doctoral Thesis considers a series of questions linking the practice of ministry with academic discourse: In what areas of ministry am I invested? Is there a demonstrated need of research in ministry in this area? Is this topic manageable in terms of the parameters of this project? How much background knowledge do I possess about this topic? Is this topic substantial enough to be worthy of exploration (genericity)? Does the topic bring together an academic discourse with a context or problem in contemporary ministry in such a way that may help the church? Who is the thesis for? What problem (in ministry) is it trying to solve, or what opportunity is it trying to explore?

THE DOCTOR OF MINISTRY THESIS PROJECT: FROM PROSPECTUS TO PROPOSAL TO EXAMINATION

Prospectus: The student prepares a brief (1-2 page) prospectus which functions as a request to start DMIN 901 (3 Credits). The prospectus should describe their proposed subject area and the type of project they wish to pursue, explain how this project will fit their ministry context, and what types of research will shape the thesis project (qualitative and/or quantitative). The project should have a clear ministry orientation and should build upon, but not replicate, material covered in previous DMin work. During DMIN 901, students receive input from faculty and peers to help the Prospectus develop into a Proposal. Common refinements include an adjustment of the research objectives, reducing or expanding the scope of research, introduction or refinement of qualitative and/or quantitative research methodologies, and adjusting or expanding the research bibliography and/or human research objectives.

Thesis Project Proposal: The proposal shall introduce the relevance of the topic and the stages or chapters for the thesis itself, explaining the purpose of each proposed chapter. A brief literature review shall be included. A comprehensive bibliography will be included, analyzed according to topical categories and presented in Kate L. Turabian, A Manual of Style (Rev. ed.) format. Upon acceptance by the Research Ethics and Thesis Committee, a thesis project supervisor will be assigned by the Committee. Proposals will be evaluated on the basis of the suitability and potential of the topic itself, plus adherence to the style sheet. The DMin Thesis Project Proposal is to be a maximum of ten pages long, double-spaced. Once DMIN 901 has concluded, it is normally presented at an upcoming meeting of the Research Ethics and Thesis Committee. All course work must be completed and all outstanding financial obligations with the Office of the Registrar must be met before the DMin Thesis Project Proposal will be approved and the student raised to candidacy.

Upon approval of the DMin Thesis Project Proposal, the student will achieve DMin Candidacy Status.

The Thesis Project Proposal will include the following:

  • Topic: a brief statement of the essence of the subject.

  • Title: a clear, concise wording as it will appear on the final document

  • Rationale: a description of the observed ministry problem or issue which influenced the selection of this topic. The ministry problem must be clearly defined.

  • Specific ministry actions: clearly formulate the ministry project so that it has an identifiable beginning and end. What will you do? When will you stop doing it?

  • Description of Project: a clear and thorough description of the whole undertaking of which the act of ministry is central

  • A Research Question: a carefully worded question which identifies the area to be explored. This area must directly relate to the ministry and the life of the church and/or the ministry.

  • Contribution to Knowledge of Ministry: a statement of what will be added to the body of existing knowledge about the practice of ministry. This is the genericity factor.

  • Theological Themes: a clear statement of both the theological foundation for the project and how ministry and theology will be integrated

  • Methods: Answer the following questions: What? When? How? Why? With whom? Identify the manner in which data will be recorded, interpreted and collated

  • Evaluation Procedures: identify the criteria by which the ministry action will be evaluated.

  • Bibliography: The Bibliography of the Initial Project Proposal is developed and refined to reflect any additional resources which have been identified as valuable to the project.

Note: For students in the Advanced Diploma Program, DMIN 901 may be taken after successful completion of 12 credits of 900 level courses and approval of a DMin application form.

Doctoral Thesis Project: A completed Doctoral Thesis Project is the ultimate academic outcome of the program. Predicated on an approved thesis proposal, the thesis project will be an essay of 100-125 pages, including bibliography, with the addition of any relevant appendices. It should be written strictly according to Turabian, Manual of Style (Rev. ed.). The thesis shall exhibit a central argument or idea that is developed in 3-4 chapters with a conclusion. Critical use and analysis of sources at a doctoral level is expected.

The timing of the intended project is important. The Doctoral Thesis Project research cannot begin before the final proposal has been accepted. Thesis Project proposals are proposals pertinent to future ministry, not reflection on past activities.

A minimum of a one year academic term may normally be expected from approval of a proposal to the completion of the work. During that time, it is the student’s responsibility to keep in contact with his/her primary supervisor. Portions of the draft written work should be submitted to the supervisor as they are completed, rather than waiting until the work is finished.

A Doctoral Thesis Project should develop the approved Thesis Project Proposal into a detailed statement of the ministry problem, a description of the research stages and principal resources, methodologies utilized in the research, a presentation of the research itself, a statement of findings from the research, relevant theological interpretation, overall evaluation, and implications for future ministry.

Upon receiving a complete draft copy, in the required format, the supervisor will respond in a timely fashion with possible further recommendations and changes. When the final draft is completely satisfactory in content and style, the supervisor will approve it and notify the Research Ethics & Thesis Committee. The Thesis Project essay will then be distributed to the Second and External Readers, who will offer their responses in a timely fashion.

Oral Examination: The Thesis Project shall be examined by a committee of three: the supervisor, a second reader and an external reader. If one of the examiners cannot be present, their questions will be sent to the primary supervisor and a substitute faculty member will ask the questions on their behalf. At the examination, after an opening prayer and a brief introduction by the primary supervisor, each candidate will have 20 minutes to make an oral presentation of their work. Students should use the following outline to organize their presentation:

  1. Their ministry context
  2. Ministry problem observed
  3. The means sought to address the problem
  4. Methodology used
  5. Highlights of the theological reflection
  6. Reported findings
  7. Implications for ministry and mission
  8. Contributions to the candidate’s own spiritual formation
  9. Future areas of research to be explored

The weight of the oral presentation should rest on the final three categories – the theological reflection that is distinctive of Doctor of Ministry work, the research findings, and the implications for ministry and mission (the “so what?”) of the research.

At the close of the oral presentation, the examiners will ask questions of the candidate for between thirty and sixty minutes. At the end of the examination, the candidate will exit while the examiners evaluate the candidate’s written submission, oral presentation and responses provided during the examination. When their deliberation is complete, they will invite the candidae to return and receive their recommendations and any requirements. Possible outcomes of the examination are: pass with distinction, pass, minor revisions required, major revisions required, and fail. Following a successful examination, the primary supervisor shall update the student’s academic record.

In consultation with the primary thesis supervisor, the candidate may invite three or four people to attend the examination. They may not pose questions. Core Faculty members at Carey Theological College may attend the examination and may ask one question each, not including any subsequent clarifying questions.

FACULTY ADVISOR, DOCTORAL PROJECT SUPERVISOR, SECOND AND EXTERNAL READERS

Faculty Advisor: Core faculty members are assigned to each Adv. Dip/ DMin student as a personal point of contact from the beginning of their Adv. Dip/ DMin studies until a supervisor is appointed following the approval of the thesis project proposal. Faculty advisors initiate contact with Adv. Dip/ DMin students approximately once per term, recommending Adv. Dip/ DMin courses. The advisor is not the same as the thesis project supervisor, although in many cases the advisor continues to support the Adv. Dip/ DMin student after the approval of the thesis project proposal, either as the thesis project supervisor or as second reader.

Once all coursework has been completed and a successful Thesis Project Proposal has been approved by the Research Ethics and Thesis Committee, the student enters the Candidacy Stage. At the Candidacy Stage, in consultation with the student, the Research Ethics & Thesis Committee will recommend the appointment of a thesis supervisor, to be approved by the President.

The Doctoral Project Primary Supervisor

The supervisor will be selected on the basis of his/her general graduate competency in the field, and reasonable familiarity with the student’s proposed thesis topic. Once approved, the supervisor and student will support the student’s program of research and writing. The primary supervisor:

  • Helps motivate the student to follow the agreed timeline which was presented to the student at the Project seminar for the completion of the project (normally within 1 year) and checks on the progress
  • Is sufficiently familiar with the topic of research to provide guidance and/or has a willingness to gain that familiarity before agreeing to act as a supervisor.
  • Is accessible to the student for consultation and discussion of the student’s research progress. The frequency of meetings will vary from project to project but in no case should interaction be less frequent than once per month.
  • Responds in a timely and thorough manner to written work submitted by the student, with constructive suggestions for improvement and continuation. The turnaround time for comments on written work should not normally exceed three weeks.
  • Makes arrangements to ensure continuity of supervision when the supervisor will be absent for extended periods, e.g. a month or longer.
  • Ensures that the research environment is safe, healthy and free from harassment, discrimination.
  • Works with the second reader of the doctoral project who are selected by the Research Ethics & Thesis Committee and the Principal.
  • Makes recommendations to students such as hiring of an editor to ensure that the final project is of professional quality.
  • The supervisor and second reader are to sign off on the project before the Oral Presentation.
  • Provide three or four substantial questions for the oral examination. Acknowledgement: This Guideline is adapted from the UBC Graduate program Supervisors Responsibilities https://www.grad.ubc.ca/handbook-graduate-supervision/supervisor-responsibilities

The Second Reader

The doctoral project second reader plays an important role in the DMin program. Early input from the second readers to the primary supervisor will improve the effectiveness of the research, the quality of the final thesis, and contribute towards the success of the oral presentation. Note that the second reader’s responsibilities are to the primary supervisor, not to the student. It would be confusing for everyone for the student to have two supervisors, but beneficial for the project to have the second reader’s input from the outset. The Second Reader will:

  • Provide input on the DMin project proposal to the primary supervisor (i.e. suggest resources, identify problems and pertinent areas of inquiry to pursue), usually at one or perhaps two meetings during the proposal stage.
  • Serve as a resource person to the primary supervisor during the project as required (possibly one more meeting with the supervisor, or answering specific emails regarding resources)
  • Participate on the examination panel that assesses the final thesis project project: ask three or four substantial questions, make comments, and participate in the written assessment (grading) of the final thesis project (pass with distinction, pass, minor revisions required, major revisions required, fail).

Responsibilities of External Readers

While the supervisor and the second reader are directly involved from the outset of the project, the external reader reads and evaluates the completed project-thesis. The external reader is expected to carefully and critically read the thesis project upon its completion. This will entail a consideration of the quality of the content, argumentation, the use of language, formatting and whether it meets the academic and ministry criteria identified in Carey’s Doctor of Ministry degree. The doctoral project external reader will participate on the examination panel that assesses the final thesis project project: ask three or four substantial questions, make comments, and participate in the written assessment (grading) of the final thesis project (pass with distinction, pass, minor revisions required, major revisions required, fail).

RESPONSIBILITIES OF STUDENTS Disclaimers and Declarations

It is the responsibility of the student to achieve the stages of the program and satisfy all degree requirements.

The College reserves the right to modify requirements and expectations for all degree programs. Please check the most current academic catalogue for the most updated requirements, policies and regulations.

Student Responsibilities and Conduct All D. Min. students are expected to exhibit the highest standards of ethical conduct during their studies. Expectations are addressed in the Carey Code of Conduct. There is a zero tolerance for harassment of any kind and academic dishonesty. Immediate termination of student status will result.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

  1. Complete the required number of credit hours of study for the relevant program.
  2. Minimum GPA required for the program of study: 3.0 GPA (B) for Advanced Diploma and 3.30 GPA (B+) for DMin
  3. Upon successful completion of the thesis defense, DMin students are required to provide the Office of the Registrar with 2 bound copies of the finalized thesis for inclusion in the Carey thesis archives.
  4. In compliance with all academic policies and student code of conduct set forth in this Academic Catalogue.
  5. All accounts payable and due with Carey Theological College and Carey Hall are paid in full.
  6. Senate approval before graduation.

Students may apply for graduation every semester to receive official transcripts and the graduation diploma. Graduation application forms must be completed and submitted 1 month before the end of the student’s graduating term.

  • DMin students who wish to obtain their own doctoral gowns must arrange to purchase or rent them in time for the graduation ceremony. Gown guidelines are available from the Registrar.

Additional Graduation Requirements for Master’s Programs

Theological Integration Project for Mission & Ministry: Each student enrolled in a master’s degree program at Carey is required to create and maintain a student portfolio to chart the growth in specific competency areas in one’s program of study where the culmination of evidence of the competencies will be demonstrated through the theological integration project. Students are required to do an oral presentation of their project prior to graduation.

All students are required to complete the supervised ministry/peer learning course, which includes mentorship and practicum involvement. Please note: students who desire to include CPE (Clinical Pastoral Education) credits in their program may do so as elective/specialization courses. An individual who wishes to incorporate CPE into the practicum portion of the Capstone courses must receive approval and make arrangements with the supervising faculty member and the Office of the Registrar.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees

Carey Theological College tries to keep fees at a level that will permit most qualified persons to attend. The fees incurred by students meet only a portion of the total cost of providing education and operating the college. We are grateful for the support of the churches of the Canadian Baptists of Western Canada, foundations, and interested friends.

Course registration and tuition is due on the first day of class. If students are unable to meet this deadline, it will be necessary for them to submit a letter of appeal to the Office of the Registrar. Payment plans can be negotiated with the Registrar’s office as needed.

TuitionDoctoralMasters/Diploma
Tuition (per credit hour)$450$345
Audit (per credit hour)$160$160
Program FeesDoctoralMasters/Diploma
Admission Confirmation Fee (non-refundable)$100$100
Graduation Fee$0$0
Graduation Ceremony Fee$100$100
Prior Learning Assessment Evaluation Fee (mature students only)$300$200
Letter of Permission per course (for course transfers)$100$100
Official Hard-copy Transcript$10$10
Official Electronic Transcript$5$5
Release Financial or Registration Lock$50$50
Dishonored Cheques$50$50
Graduation Certificate Replacement$50$50
D.Min. Thesis Extension Fee (per term, max 3 extensions)$450
Reread Fee (If thesis/thesis is rejected/failed and has to be rewritten)$500

Payment, Late Payment, and Outstanding Accounts

Payment of all fees and tuition must be in Canadian dollars. Cheques, bank drafts, and postal money orders may be received by mail and Visa, MasterCard, are acceptable forms of online payment through Carey’s student information management system (Populi). We encourage students to pay with the above forms of payment.

Under extenuating circumstances, payments may be made by cash in person at Carey’s head office in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada during its regular hours of operation. Under Carey’s cash handling policy, we are only able to accept a maximum of $1350 per student account per semester. For refunds, up to $500 in cash will be provided, with excess issued as a cheque in the student’s name.

All tuition is due and payable on the first day of term.

Please note: If there is any outstanding indebtedness to the College, degree parchments, transcripts, grade reports, and letters of permission will not be released until such matters have been cleared with the Registrar’s Office. Student registration for new semesters will be locked if there is an outstanding balance not on the payment plan; or the payment plan is not being followed.

Changes of Registration, Withdrawal and Refunds

Normally, refunds will only be provided on outstanding balances at the completion of the program or formal withdrawal from the program. In all other cases, students who withdraw from a course during the duration of their program will have their accounts credited for a future course.

Unless otherwise stated, the tuition amount that may be credited for future classes for withdrawing from a course after the start date is as follows:

  • No further credits or refunds are available after these dates.
  • Students must notify the Registrar in writing if they are withdrawing from a course. Credit for tuition amounts are calculated based on the date that the Registrar receives this notification.
  • There will be a full refund for any cancelled courses.
Period from the start of the termTranscript RecordCredit/refund amount
Week 1No record of course on transcript100%
Week 2No record of course on transcript75%
Week 3 to 5“W” on transcript50%
Week 6 to 10“F” on transcript0%

Tax Receipts

For income tax purposes, T2202A forms related to tuition payments will be posted by February 28 of the following year. Students can access these through their portal in the Student Information System.

Student Financial Aid

Student Assistance, Scholarships

As an institution that offers programs fully online, Carey Theological College does not qualify as an eligible institution where its students can secure student loans from provincial government sources across Canada. However, Carey offers generous financial aid packages to qualified students in need.

Carey Theological College makes a variety of awards and benefits available to students to help reduce the financial burden of study. These include competitive scholarships, need-based bursaries, bursaries and tuition discounts associated with institutional partnership relationships, and opportunities for study-related work in the form of Teaching Assistantships. Teaching Assistantships are only available to students with valid work permits in Canada.

Please visit https://carey-edu.ca/student-services/ for eligibility criteria and detailed information.

In addition to the financial awards managed directly by Carey, students may be eligible for a range of awards and other forms of funding provided by external organizations. For example, students who serve with the Canadian Baptists of Western Canada are advised that several forms of student aid funding are available through the Canadian Baptists of Western Canada Foundation. Application for these is made directly to the Foundation. Students are reminded that College staff will not be aware of all the forms of funding that may be available; each student is encouraged to explore widely for possible assistance with study.

Student Awards

A number of post-degree awards are given to students at graduation each year in recognition of outstanding performance in various areas. These vary from year to year. Recent examples include prizes for excellence in pastoral care, in preaching, in biblical studies and theology, in lay leadership, the D.Min. Fellows Program, and in evangelization and ministry in the Chinese community.

Applying for Student Assistance

Applicants must be fully admitted as active status Carey students, normally in a degree or diploma program at the Master’s or doctoral level.

All students must apply for financial aid using the standard financial aid application separate from the admission application form. The College will not process applications for financial aid until a student has been admitted to study.

You may find further information on financial aid at the link https://carey-edu.ca/student-services/tuition-and-financial-aid/. If questions arise, please contact the Office of the Registrar.

Applications for all scholarships and bursaries are due on the same deadline as the early admissions deadline each term. Additional rounds of financial aid applications will be received if additional awards become available prior to the end of the term. CBWC and Partnership Bursaries require confirmation of current eligibility each term. This should be communicated to the Registrar’s Office 1 month before the start of term.

The amount of Carey-managed Financial Aid applied to a student’s account cannot exceed the student’s outstanding balance for tuition.

Carey-managed Financial Aid cannot be applied to fees for transcripts, graduation, extensions, transfers, etc.
Students who drop or withdraw from courses after receiving Carey-managed Financial Aid will have the amounts of Financial Aid reversed from their accounts. If students withdraw after the deadline for a 100% refund, then students are responsible for the outstanding balances after the reversal of the Financial Aid. This includes students who withdraw after the last day of withdrawal with the grade of "W". In extenuating circumstances students can write a letter of appeal.

Other policy information related to Financial Aid is included in the annual resource materials on financial assistance provided through the Registrar’s Office. Please email registrar@carey-edu.ca for more information.

Admissions

Program Admission Requirements

Admissions to each program at Carey share similar requirements with specific requirements as outlined below.

Occasional

Diploma

Master’s

Advanced Diploma

Doctoral

Minimum prior academic requirement for the program for which courses is being sought to enrol

Four-year Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution with at least a B- average (2.7 GPA)

Any theological Master’s degree from an accredited institution with at least a B- average (2.7 GPA)

MDiv or 72 graduate level credit equivalent from an ATS accredited (or equivalent) institution with at least a B+ average (3.3 GPA) plus completion of an Advanced Diploma (18 doctoral level credits) with a B + average (3.3 GPA)

For accelerated Bachelor’s and Master’s program, at least 90 credits of the Bachelor’s program with at least a B average (3.0 GPA)

Students with a lower GPA may be considered for admission with the approval of the Admissions Committee

Mature Christian showing an aptitude for ministry with an aptitude for using technology for learning and communication.

Completed online application form 

Applicants whose first language is not the language in which the program is taught (e.g. English, Mandarin, Cantonese or Spanish) should refer to the Language Requirements for Admissions section for information on fulfilling language entrance requirements.

Unofficial transcript

Official transcripts from all schools attended or a notarized letter accompanying a copy of the original transcript

Confidential references:

  1. Pastoral (Ministry Supervisor or Denominational Rep for Doctoral only) Reference 
  2. Character Reference
  3. Academic Reference (Doctoral only)
  4. A letter of affirmation from the church supporting the applicant for theological studies, where the applicant is a currently active member of the congregation

Submission of a video responding to admissions interview questions

Interview with a faculty advisor

A sample academic paper or other formal written piece demonstrating the applicant’s ability to write at the intended program level.

1000-word prospectus with online application

Minimum three years of active professional ministry after graduation and current ministry engagement

Accelerated Bachelor’s and Master’s Program Admission Requirements

For students currently enrolled with a partner institution offering an Accelerated Bachelor’s and Master’s program, students from the partner institution will indicate their intent at the beginning of their studies to pursue this program. Typical entrance to the Master’s program will occur in the third year of the student’s Bachelor’s program after completing at least 90 credits of study at the Bachelor’s level but each requirement may be different from partner institutions. Students must have achieved a 3.0 GPA in the first three-years of their Bachelor’s degree program in order to apply to the Master’s program. The application process is the same as the regular program including applying online for the particular Master’s program being sought. In addition a letter of referral is required by the partner institution indicating their support for the student to continue on to the Master’s program.

Students will enter under the regular student classification. Students are required to meet the graduation requirements for both the Bachelor’s and Master’s programs. Advanced standing with credit will normally be provided for the following courses AFTER a student satisfies and graduates from the Bachelor’s program requirements.

BIBL 501 Old Testament I BIBL 502 Old Testament II BIBL 511 New Testament I BIBL 512 New Testament II HIST 501 Church History I HIST 502 Church History II THEO 501 Christian Thought I THEO 502 Christian Thought II

Doctor of Ministry and Advanced Diploma Program Admission Requirements

Advanced Diploma

Doctoral

Any theological Master’s degree from an accredited institution with at least a B- average (2.7 GPA)

MDiv or 72 graduate level credit equivalent from an ATS accredited (or equivalent) institution with at least a B+ average (3.3 GPA) plus completion of an Advanced Diploma (18 doctoral level credits) with a B + average (3.3 GPS)

Students with a lower GPA may be considered for admission with the approval of the Admissions Committee

Mature Christian showing an aptitude for ministry with an aptitude for using technology for learning and communication.

Completed online application form 

Applicants whose first language is not English should refer to the Language Requirements for Admissions section for information on fulfilling language entrance requirements.

Official transcripts from all schools attended or a notarized letter accompanying a copy of the original transcript

Confidential references:

  1. Pastoral (Ministry Supervisor or Denominational Rep for Doctoral only) Reference 
  2. Character Reference
  3. Academic Reference (Doctoral only)
  4. A letter of affirmation from the church supporting the applicant for theological studies, where the applicant is a currently active member of the congregation

Interview with a faculty advisor

A current CV

A sample academic paper or other formal written piece demonstrating the applicant’s ability to write at the intended program level.

A written statement of 1,000 words detailing: (1) Ministry experience and view of ministry; (2) Reasons for pursuing Dmin education; (3) Goals for the program and vision for the future of your ministry; (4) Proposed area of interest for ministry project and key ministry questions

Minimum three years of active professional ministry after graduation and current ministry engagement

Application Fee

Ministry Components

All Advanced Diploma and DMin students are expected to be involved in ministry. Courses and theses are developed in light of one’s ministry. Students will engage in intentional reflection on ministry and peer interaction. The Carey DMin program is responsive to the needs of the church and reflects contemporary trends and issues in ministry and the church.

RESEARCH ETHICS Mandate: All research involving human participants conducted in association with Carey Theological College may commence only after receiving formal approval from Carey’s Research Ethics & Thesis Committee. Two levels of approval are possible: (1) Formal Review and Approval: Full Review. This level of review is for research with human participants through which data is collected through interviews, questionnaires, participant observations, journals and other second or third party means. Examples of research include doctoral and master theses, course related assignments that involve more than minimal risk to confidentiality and anonymity, faculty research projects with human participants and any funded research undertaken by either students or faculty. Research that is a degree requirement (e.g. D Min) and involves human participants requires a full ethics review. The student is required to submit the Application for Ethics Review for Research Involving Human Participants. The Research Ethics & Thesis Committee at Carey Theological College will receive the application, and no research that involves more than minimal risk to human participants may commence without formal review, approval and notification in writing of approval. (2) Review and Approval: Expedited Review. This level of review is for research with human participants judged to be of minimal risk to human participants and their confidentiality and anonymity. Examples of research include observations at public events, public meetings, review of course evaluations, research of documents, research projects as part of course assignments (if judged to be of minimal risk to human participants and confirmation as such is provided in a Request for Expedited Review), data gathered using anonymous surveys (e.g. Survey Monkey), interview records taken from public forums, institutional-initiated surveys through which confidentiality and anonymity are ensured. In the case of course related assignments, the student’s professor holds the primary responsibility for recommending an expedited review to a student; the student then holds the primary responsibility for submitting a request in writing to the Research Ethics & Thesis Committee. The student or faculty is required to apply for an expedited review of their proposed research through submission of the Request for an Expedited Review of Research. The Research Ethics & Thesis Committee will receive the letter, and no research may commence without formal approval by the Research Ethics & Thesis Committee of the student’s letter requesting an expedited review.

General Admission Requirements and Process

Before initiating the admissions process with Carey it is the student’s responsibility to familiarize themselves with the requirements and policies pertaining to their program of interest (see the program information under Carey Academic Programs, above), and also with Carey’s statement of faith and community expectations. These statements reflect Carey’s core theological and community values from which personal and academic integrity stem. In applying to study at Carey, students indicate their willingness to respect and uphold the common values and related practices of the Carey academic community. Students are not required to sign the specific Carey statement of faith, but all students will need to affirm personal Christian faith as part of the application process and respect the faith commitments of the Carey community as expressed in Carey’s statement.

Key Admission Dates

Carey Theological college offers the rolling admission, students may apply for admission and financial assistance any time of the year. It is advised that potential students begin the process of applying early to allow sufficient time for writing essay responses and receipt of reference letters. All applicants will be reviewed monthly by the admission committee and be notified of the result.

Fall 2021 Winter 2022 Spring 2022 Summer 2022 Fall 2022
General application and Financial Aid Deadline The last day of every month
Application Review Date Within the 1st week of every month.
If it is the weekend, the committee will meet on the Friday prior to the 15th.
Term admissions application and financial aid deadline August 27, 2021 Dec 3, 2021 Feb 28, 2022 May 27, 2022 Aug 26, 2022
Financial aid deadline Sept 13, 2021 Dec 20, 2021 Mar 14, 2022 Jun 13, 2021 Sep 12, 2022
Admission response sent out via email to all applicants Send by the next business day after review date
Start of term Sept 27, 2021 Jan 3, 2022 Mar 28, 2022 Jun 27, 2022 Sep 26, 2022
End of term Dec 3, 2021 Mar 11, 2022 Jun 10, 2022 Sep 02, 2022 Dec 02, 2022
Grades to appear in Populi Dec 17, 2021 Mar 25, 2022 Jun 24, 2022 Sep 16, 2022 Dec 16, 2022

Language Requirements for Admissions

English, Cantonese, Mandarin and Spanish (CETI program) are the primary languages of instruction at Carey Theological College.

There are several ways to meet the language requirements.

  1. Complete four or more consecutive years of full-time education in one of the primary languages in a country where the primary language is the principal language, immediately prior to enrolling at Carey Theological College.

  2. Graduate from a recognized degree program at an accredited university at which the primary language is the language of instruction.

  3. Achieve a grade of 70% or better on the provincial examination portion of BC English 12 or English Literature 12 or the equivalent.

  4. Achieve a final grade of 4 or better on Advanced Placement (AP) English Language & Composition or AP Literature & Composition; or achieve a final grade of 5 or better on International Baccalaureate English A1 or A2 (higher-level or standard-level).

  5. Achieve the competence standard indicated by Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) measures the ability of non-native speakers of English to use and understand English as it is spoken, written, and heard in academic settings. The test helps students demonstrate that they have the English skills necessary for effective communication and successful coursework. Applicants whose first language is not English must submit satisfactory results from an internet-based TOEFL test taken within the last two years. Scores will be sent to Carey directly from Educational Testing Service. (TOEFL is available from Education Testing Service at www.ets.org). Refer to minimum required scores per program below.

Minimum Test Score (iBT)
Test Categories:MastersDoctoral
Reading20+22+
Listening20+22+
Speaking20+22+
Writing20+22+
Minimum Total90+100

Use Carey’s code number 5981 when indicating Carey as a score recipient.

  1. Achieved an overall score of 6.5 on the IELTS test, with no less than 6.5 in all language competency requirements.

  2. Achieved an overall score of 110 on the Duolingo English Test.

Students can appeal the language requirement when they apply to Carey by providing a written record of their language experience in school, workplace, and life. The Admissions Committee may require a writing sample to assess an applicant’s language competency. The Admissions Committee will consider the student’s qualifications and the Committee’s decision will be final.

Student Classification

Regular Program Students

These are students who have met all program admissions requirements and who have been admitted into an academic program with no conditions. Students need to register for at least one course per year in order to maintain active student status.

Full Time Student Designation

For external purposes , full-time study is defined as 27 credit hours per academic year (September to August) or 9 credit hours per term for 3 terms in a school year.

Inactive Students & Leave of Absence

Students who do not complete 6 credits of coursework within two sequential academic years will be classified as inactive. In order to retain active student status within the degree program, students must apply for a leave of absence via the Office of the Registrar. A maximum of 2 extensions will be granted over the duration of the student’s program. (See the fee table under Financial Information for more details concerning the extension fee.) After a 3-year period of inactivity, the student will be removed from the program roster. If the student wishes to reactivate their status, a letter outlining the reasons for inactivity and desire to continue studies must be submitted and approved to the Office of the Registrar.

Unclassified and Visiting Students

Students from other ATS accredited colleges taking courses from Carey for transfer credit are classified as “visiting students” and do not need to make a formal application. Normally a Letter of Permission from the student’s school is used to grant access to Carey courses.

Undeclared Student Status

Students who wish to take individual courses for personal interest, professional development, or to explore possible seminary study, but who are not currently pursuing full admission to a degree or diploma program may study at Carey under undeclared student status. Undeclared students are admitted through a simplified process. Normally they may take up to 9 credits before seeking admission to a formal program; this may be extended by permission from the Registrar. Program admission requires completion of the remaining parts of the program admission package. An undeclared student may only take a maximum of 2 courses in a single semester.

Mature Student Status

Mature Student status is applicable to graduate programs (M.Div., MACM and graduate Diplomas). It may be granted to students who do not have a completed 4-year undergraduate degree, but who have sufficient relevant work and/or life experience to prepare them for study in the degree program.

A prospective student must be 30 years of age or older to be considered for admission under Mature Student status. He/she must provide a detailed summary of relevant training and experience which demonstrate readiness for theological study at the graduate level. This should include an account of learning opportunities experienced, of work and ministry history, with other relevant life experience. Please provide dates and length of time in various roles, specific information on courses and training taken, and on relevant achievements (eg: ordination, certification, publications, etc.). Because educational equivalence must involve reflection as well as simple experience, please also include information on reading and professional development practices, and identify ways in which your life and ministry experiences have been the subject of focused reflection, and especially of reflection in conversation with other peers and supervisors.

Once the Admissions Committee has reviewed the prospective student’s dossier and granted admission under Mature Student status, the student will be admitted to the relevant program on a provisional basis. Note that though a student may be admitted directly to a degree program on a Mature Student basis, in most cases those who enter with Mature Student status are admitted initially to a graduate Diploma program. This allows the candidate to engage in graduate studies, and it can become a pathway into admission into a graduate degree. (For those with Mature Student status, admission to the Diploma does not guarantee subsequent admission to a Degree.)

Note that normally a student admitted under Mature Student status retains that designation throughout the degree program, even after full admission upon review. In some cases, undergraduate degree completion equivalency can be established through a combination of recognition for courses taken and a formal Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) review by the Office of the Registrar, in which case Mature Student status may be dropped and Regular Student Status granted.

Accreditation regulations require that Carey limit the number of Mature Students who are active in any master’s degree program at any one time. This has several practical implications:

  1. Even though a prospective student has the appropriate qualifications to receive Mature Student status, Carey may not be able to grant admission to a degree program on this basis if Mature Student quotas have already been filled. Carey reserves the right to prioritize student applications for Mature Student status, based on strength of candidates’ application, perceived benefit of the program to the student, and perceived contribution of the student to the program.

  2. Carey reviews and approves applications for Mature Student status prior to each term.

  3. Carey reserves the right to require Mature Students to enroll in a higher number of courses per year than what is normally needed to maintain current student status in a degree program. Mature Students are currently required to take a minimum of 2 courses per academic year, for credit, in order to maintain their current student status. Those who fail to maintain this level of enrolment may be deemed inactive in the degree program and registered in the corresponding Diploma; re-admission will be required in order to regain active status in the graduate degree.

    Continuing Education Credit Registration (CBWC)

    Carey courses may be audited by individuals who are not registered as for-credit students in order to fulfill the continuing education requirement for ministers credentialed by the Canadian Baptists of Western Canada.

    International Students

    As an online institution, Carey does not meet the requirements under Canada Immigation Services that allow prospective students to acquire a student visa.

    Transfer Credits, Shared Credits, Advanced Standing and Exemptions

    Students with previous theological training from a recognized institution may be eligible to receive some credit toward their program of study at Carey, through credit transfer, shared credit, or advanced standing.

Several general principles apply in each case:

  • Prior study which is to be applied toward Carey programs must have been taken for-credit at an accredited or comparable institution

  • Credits to be applied must have been earned within the past 10 years

  • Transfer, shared credit, and advanced standing credits are only applicable to Diploma, Master’s, Advanced Diploma and Doctoral degree programs.

  • A maximum number of shared, transfer, or advanced standing credits may be applied to any Carey degree program, as outlined below

  • To receive any Carey degree, a student must take a minimum of 1 year of study in courses earned at Carey; the College’s normal practice is to allow no more than ⅔ of the credits toward a degree to be met through a combination of externally shared, transfer, and advanced standing credits

  • Externally shared, transfer, and advanced standing credits are applied to a student’s Carey program on a pass/fail basis and are not included in GPA calculation

Assessment of shared/transfer credit and advanced standing is normally done in conjunction with admission, though the two decisions are made independently. You will be asked to signal your desire for an assessment of shared/transfer credit and/or advanced standing as part of your admission process. The Admissions Committee reserves the right to decide on the total number of transfer, shared, and advanced standing credits granted to a student toward the requirements of a particular academic program.

Transfer Credits

Where a student has completed graduate-level coursework but not an academic program at another accredited seminary or academic institution prior to applying at Carey, and a particular graduate course taken in that setting can be shown to have relevance to his/her master’s program at Carey, the course may be applied as transfer credit. Transfer of prior course credits must be processed at the time of admission.

Students who wish to apply courses from another institution toward a Carey program after admission to Carey must receive prior written approval. Requests for transfer credit should be made to the Office of the Registrar. After written approval is received and a Letter of Permission (LOP) is granted, the student must apply and register for such courses with the appropriate institution. On completion, an official transcript from the other institution must be sent to the Office of the Registrar. Transfer credit is awarded only if the grade achieved is at least of the average grade required to graduate from the Carey program (D.Min. minimum: B, masters programs minimum: B-).

There is a fee for processing a Letter of Permission for transfer credits. See Schedule of Fees. Carey course offerings are published in advance so that students may plan their course load to fulfill the requirements of their program. Students should note the maximum number of transfer credits that are acceptable.

Maximum combined shared/transferred credits from another accredited seminary or religious institution that can be applied to a Carey degree program: ADP: 6; MDiv: 36; MACM, MPM, MASF: 24; Diploma: 6.

Maximum combined shared/transferred credits earned at Carey that can be applied to a Carey degree program: ADP: 12 MDiv: 48; MACM, MPM, MASF: 30; Diploma: 15.

Shared Credit

Where a student has completed a graduate academic program at another accredited seminary or religious institution, and a particular course taken as part of that program can be shown to have specific relevance to one’s master’s program at Carey, shared credits may be awarded. Shared credits function similarly to transfer credits; however, because they are applied simultaneously to two different degrees, accreditation standards place stricter limits on the number of shared credits that can be applied.

A minimum grade of B- is required and the course must have been taken within the last 10 years. The number of shared credits granted will be dependent on the discretion of the Admissions Committee, in consultation with ATS guidelines and policies. Shared credits must be processed at the time of admission.

Advanced Standing with Credit

Advanced Standing with Credit is the process by which a student’s prior learning through degree program coursework in an accredited undergraduate theological institution is recognized as providing limited equivalency to the requirements of a seminary degree program, allowing a corresponding reduction in graduate credits required for graduation. It is a way of acknowledging that some students enter seminary with an extensive background in theological study that overlaps to some degree with what is covered in the seminary program, in a manner that would not be true of the typical seminary student who lacks that background. (A parallel process is occasionally applied for students with Th.M. credits or two theological master’s degrees who seek Advanced Standing toward the D.Min.)

When assessing Advanced Standing with Credit, the Office of the Registrar will review a student’s undergraduate transcripts, identifying areas of correspondence with core classes required in the Carey program. Credit will be granted for the relevant Carey courses based on assessed equivalency. Advanced standing may not be awarded for required electives. No more than 33% of credits required for the Carey program may be covered through Advanced Standing. Normally Advanced Standing is granted only to students who have completed a theological undergraduate degree whose program focus is similar to that of the Carey degree, where there is a clear specialization (50-60+ credits) in the area where Advanced Standing is sought. Ministry experience cannot be used to substitute for academic credits.

Please note that credits granted through Advanced Standing assessment are equivalency credits, meaning they are non-transferrable, and can only be used in the context of the relevant Carey degree program.

Students are not permitted to register in courses for which they have been granted Advanced Standing with Credit.

Maximum Advanced Standing credits: ADP: 6; MDiv: 24; MACM, MPM, MASF: 15; Diploma: 6

Exemption

Exemption is when a student is not required to enrol in a required course based on extensive relevant experience. An exemption does not reduce the overall number of credits required for the program. The required credits must be replaced with an alternative course; typically from a course in the same discipline or upon approval by the Office of the Registrar.

Students are not permitted to register in courses for which they have been granted Exemptions.

Exemptions are treated the same as Advanced Standing with Credit in regards to the total number of combined Exemptions and Advanced Standing with which Credit must not exceed: ADP: 6; MDiv: 24; MACM, MPM, MASF: 15; Diploma: 6.

Course Registration

Students are advised to register a minimum of one month prior to the beginning of the term. Some courses require reading or work to be posted or submitted on the first week online, so students are advised to check the course syllabi for all the course requirements. It should be noted that both the required and elective courses can be changed by Senate decision without public notice.

To register for courses, login to Carey Populi at https://carey.populiweb.com/ and click on ‘My Profile,’ then ‘Registration’. This list shows all upcoming courses required for your program. Select the course you would like to register and click ‘Enroll’, and proceed to make a payment on the ‘Financial’ tab. A $100 deposit is required on registration to hold your place. This deposit is non-refundable and will be applied to your tuition fee. The remaining balance is due on the first day of class. For more detailed instructions, please visit [this support page][https://support.populiweb.com/hc/en-us/articles/223792447].

Course registration for a particular term opens one week after the previous term begins and closes the first Friday of the first week after the beginning of the term at 5pm Pacific Standard Time.

Assessment and Grading

Grading Scale: Diplomas, Masters Programs

(3 credit hours should be equal to 127.5 clock hours of work.)

Grade classDescriptorsLetter gradesGPADetail%
A class work
Excellent, superior work
Effectively and exceptionally accomplishes all course outcomes and objectives. Work produced is excellent quality, of publishable quality, and benefits the wider Christian community. Shows exceptional growth/mastery. Exceptionally creativity and originality in approach to the subject.
A+4.0Special Commendation Work100-98
A4.0Consistent A-class work97-94
A-3.7Gnerally A-class work, some lapses and areas for refinement93-90
B class work
Good solid work
Accomplishes all course outcomes and objectives. Work produced is good quality, and beneficial to peers and fellow students. Growth/mastery of course material is good. Shows creativity and originality in approach to the subject.
B+3.3Primarily B-class, superior to some areas89-87
B3.0Consistent B-class work86-84
B-2.7Generally B-class work, some lapses and areas for refinement83-80
C class work
Passible but needs to improve
Accomplishes enough course outcomes and objectives to be passible. Work produced is not recommended for dissemination unless qualified. Growth/mastery is basic, but encouraged to repeat the course. Shows hints of creativity and originality, but not consistent.
C+2.3Primarily C-class work, better in some areas79-77
C2.0Consistent C-class work76-74
C-1.7Generally C-class work, but this is based on generous interpretation. Elements that fall significantly short, marginally passable.73-70
F class work
Not passable
Fails to accomplish course outcomes and objectives. Work should not be disseminated under any condition. Little to no growth/mastery of course material. Fails to show creativity or originality in approach to the subject.F0Generally unpassable work.69-0

Grading Scale: Advanced Diploma and Doctor of Ministry

(3 credit hours should be equal to 150 hours of work.)

Grade classDescriptorsLetter gradesGPADetail%
A class work
Excellent, superior work
Effectively and exceptionally accomplishes all course outcomes and objectives. Work produced is excellent quality, of publishable quality, and benefits the wider Christian community. Shows exceptional growth/mastery. Exceptionally creativity and originality in approach to the subject.
A+4.0Special Commendation Work100-98
A4.0Consistent A-class work97-94
A-3.7Gnerally A-class work, some lapses and areas for refinement93-90
B class work
Good solid work
Accomplishes all course outcomes and objectives. Work produced is good quality, and beneficial to peers and fellow students. Growth/mastery of course material is good. Shows creativity and originality in approach to the subject.
B+3.3Primarily B-class, superior to some areas89-87
B3.0Consistent B-class work86-84
B-2.7Generally B-class work, some lapses and areas for refinement83-80
C class work
Unacceptable
Accomplishes enough course outcomes and objectives to be passible. Work produced is not recommended for dissemination unless qualified. Growth/mastery is basic, but encouraged to repeat the course. Shows hints of creativity and originality, but not consistent.
C+2.3Primarily C-class work, better in some areas79-77
C2.0Consistent C-class work76-74
C-1.7Generally C-class work, but this is based on generous interpretation. Elements that fall significantly short, marginally passable.73-70
F class work
Not passable
Fails to accomplish course outcomes and objectives. Work should not be disseminated under any condition. Little to no growth/mastery of course material. Fails to show creativity or originality in approach to the subject.F0Generally unpassable work.69-0

Grade Changes

It is the student’s responsibility to appeal any error in grades and to bring it to the instructor’s attention within two months following the issued grade. Grade changes are allowable for computational recording errors and must be corrected no later than the last day of classes of the next full term.

Extensions

Extensions for course work will only be granted in exceptional circumstances. If a student requests an extension that will prevent the professor from submitting the final grade within 30 days following the final assignment, the student must file a formal petition with the Registrar for the extension. On approval, the Registrar will establish extension deadlines which are final. The student may receive a grade reduction of up to one-third of the final mark for work submitted under these extension guidelines.

Academic Probation

In each program of study, Carey Theological College sets standards for the competencies students are expected to achieve. Satisfactory academic performance (D.Min.: B, M.Div.: B-; MACM: B-) is a necessary prerequisite for a student to continue their program of studies. Should a student achieve final grades below the minimum standard in three courses, or fail to complete those courses within the specified timelines, or should the student’s GPA fall below graduation requirements, the student will be placed on academic probation. In such cases, the student will be placed under the supervision of the Office of the Registrar, which may recommend one of several alternatives including remedial work upon approval of the professor(s) of the course(s) that caused the drop in GPA, retaking courses or taking additional courses with or without an extension of time to complete the program to raise the GPA to an acceptable level, or withdrawal from studies. Students are expected to rectify their academic probation status within one year.

Repeated Courses

A student will be permitted to repeat a course in which he/she has received an ‘F’ grade. The better grade will appear on the student’s transcript and GPA, and an ‘R’ will replace the ‘F’. Any one course may be repeated up to two times. Regular tuition fees will be charged for repeated courses.

Academic Integrity

A high standard of academic integrity is expected of all Carey Theological College students; any infraction will be treated seriously and may be grounds for dismissal. Academic integrity involves honest and responsible scholarship. Students are expected to submit original work and give credit to other peoples’ ideas. Academic dishonesty is acting in a manner to gain unearned academic credit. Examples of academic dishonesty are:

  • Plagiarising by misrepresenting the work of another person (in whole or in part) as a student’s own work or failing to give credit for either wording or ideas that belong to another. (See next section.)

  • Submitting the same material for credit in more than one course (whether the earlier submission was at Carey or another institution).

  • Using unauthorized aids of any sort in examinations, completing work in unauthorized collaboration with others, or the unauthorized recording and use of class lectures are all examples of breaches in academic integrity.

Penalty for a lack of academic integrity may include a failing grade in the assignment, examination or course, depending on the severity of the offense. All students are responsible for knowing and practicing academic integrity.

Plagiarism

A more detailed statement of policy and procedures relating to plagiarism is available from the Office of the Registrar. The most pertinent elements have been replicated here. For more information on academic integrity and plagiarism in the wider UBC context, see also http://learningcommons.ubc.ca/resource-guides/avoid-plagiarism/.

Essentially, plagiarism involves giving the impression that the words or ideas used in one’s papers or other submitted materials are one’s own, when in fact they are taken from another source.

Plagiarism takes a variety of forms, and it comes in different degrees of severity which warrant different types of response from the school.

  1. Minor plagiarism occurs when a limited number of words or ideas in a student’s piece of writing directly reflect sources without acknowledging them, while the substance of the piece is the student’s own work. In cases of minor plagiarism, the professor is free to address the issue at his/her own discretion. Usually this involves counseling the student on integrity in research and requiring a resubmission of the paper in acceptable form before a grade is given for the assignment.

  2. Substantial plagiarism occurs when larger blocks of material are reproduced directly or with superficial changes in wording but without acknowledgement: sentences, paragraphs, and larger sections of the document. It also applies to the unacknowledged use of distinctive ideas which are critical to the development of the student’s piece, where those ideas are expressed and arranged reflecting sources that are not recognized. The minimum penalty for substantial plagiarism is the resubmission of the assignment and one full letter grade reduction being given to the offending work. The maximum penalty is an automatic failure of the course. Repeated offences will result in expulsion from the seminary.

  3. Severe plagiarism involves presentation of an entire essay or project as the student’s own work when in fact it was produced by another. Severe plagiarism automatically results in a failing grade for the course. A written reprimand will be given, with a copy kept in the student’s file. A repeated offense will result in expulsion from the seminary.

Where faculty identify clear cases of substantial or severe plagiarism, they will keep written documentation of the offending materials and provide a copy of relevant information to the Office of the Registrar. Records of institutional action and follow-up will also be maintained in the student’s file. For any cases of plagiarism reported by faculty to the Registrar’s Office, penalties will follow the chart below.

Kind of Plagiarism Consequences for the First Offense Consequences for the Second Offense Consequences for the Third Offense
Substantial Plagiarism Failure of the Assignment
 
Academic Probation
Failure of the Assignment and the Course
 
Academic Probation or Suspension
Failure of the Assignment and the Course
 
Expulsion from Seminary
Severe Plagiarism Failure of Assignment and of the Course
 
Academic Probation or Suspension
Failure of the Assignment and the Course
 
Expulsion from the Seminary
N/A
Note: It is recommended that the first case of severe plagiarism be equally weighted to a case of substantial plagiarism in calculating the consequences of second and third offenses of substantial plagiarism. In other words, one case of substantial plagiarism and one case of severe plagiarism may result in academic probation or suspension, but not expulsion.

Research Ethics

All research involving data-gathering from human subjects (through surveys, interviews, etc.) for Carey courses and programs must conform to the current Carey policy on research ethics, which is available from the Registrar’s Office and will be distributed at new student orientation. This is particularly important for the DMin program, but has implications for other students whose research interests may potentially intersect with current Canadian privacy legislation and related academic policies at Carey, UBC, and in the Canadian higher education community.

Academic Appeals

Students are assured the right to appeal any judgment relative to their academic program, whether it is permission to enter a degree program, a ruling regarding academic procedure or a grade given in any academic work. Appeals should be made to the person or committee responsible for the decision under dispute (e.g. grades to Faculty, admissions to the Admissions Office). Any such appeal must be initiated no later than two months following notification of a ruling or a grade being issued. A written statement of the ruling will be issued to the student.

Where the student is not satisfied that the appeal is fairly heard or considered, a further appeal may be made in writing to the Office of the Registrar. The Registrar’s Office will hear and discuss the circumstances attending the complaint and counsel the student regarding the issue. A written statement of the ruling will be issued to the student.

In the event that the appeal is related to the Office of the Registrar or the Admissions Officer, the President will hear and discuss the circumstances attending the complaint and counsel the student regarding the issue. A written statement of the ruling will be issued to the student.

If the student is still not satisfied, the ruling may be appealed in a written summation to the Student Appeals Committee of the Senate of Carey Theological College. The decision registered by the Senate of Carey Theological College is final.

Student Life

General

To make Carey’s educational programs as accessible as possible, Carey structures its course delivery with an effective and innovative online learning environment.

This changes the nature of “campus life,” but it does not eliminate the need to provide effective student services, nor does it undermine the importance of building a strong sense of student community. Carey seeks to address these needs in a variety of ways: in the course design, use of communication and community-building technology, formation of learner cohorts, etc. Of special importance, the College maintains a dedicated and competent team of Academic staff whose role is to support students through their entire educational experience, from inquiry and admission through to graduation.

The team is happy to provide information and to address questions and concerns that may arise. Please do not hesitate to connect by email at registrar@carey-edu.ca.

Guidelines for online discussions (netiquette)

To maximize the benefit of online discussions which are part of most Carey courses, we encourage all students to follow these principles:

  1. Participate – For the maximum benefit to all, every participant needs to contribute to the discussion. Be on time. Respond to at least one classmate for any discussion forum or blog or as many times as required by the instructor.

  2. Check previous postings – Read the previous discussion thread before answering to avoid repeating comments and/or posting in the wrong heading or thread. Try to respond to anyone who replies to your initial posting in a way that moves the discussion forward.

  3. Read Assignment Instructions before Posting –There are different types of online assignments: discussion forum, blog, wiki, group project, media presentation, survey, etc. Please read the assignment guidelines carefully before posting. If the posting involves group effort, you may consider using Chat or Collaborate within Connect to facilitate group discussions.

  4. Be Concise and Brief – Be careful to avoid wordiness. Respect the time of the other readers and aim to make one’s entries clear and concise.

  5. Cite all References – Just as you would if you were writing an academic paper, give proper credit to the sources you used in your conversations or posts.

  6. Utilize a Proper Writing Style – Proper spelling, grammatical construction and sentence structure should be utilized in all postings. Please refrain from using emoticons or slang.

  7. Be Courteous – Be ready to disagree but do not demean, harass or embarrass others. Respect the diversity of the people in your cohorts and understand that racist and sexist comments or jokes are unacceptable.

  8. Encourage Others – Help each other to develop and share ideas. Some students are more experienced with on-line settings than others. Offer your support to those who are less familiar.

  9. Use Appropriate Tones – Remember the style of writing in an academic environment, and refrain from showing extreme emotions. No yelling, throwing tantrums or rants. Humor can also be difficult to convey in text, especially if there are students whose first language is not English, so make sure everyone realizes intended humour.

  10. Respect Others – An online classroom will include participants from a wide range of backgrounds (culture, age, socio-economic, etc.). It is important to respect fellow classmates’ opinions and not impose your own perception or bias on others. At Carey, there also are core courses shared by students enrolled in different degree programs. It is important to learn to listen and appreciate each other’s unique contribution to the learning experience.

    Accountability and Disciplinary Procedures

    In choosing to participate in the Carey community, students indicate their willingness to live and work in an environment of mutual accountability. All members of our community become co-owners of Carey’s mission and institutional culture, and we all have the responsibility not only to promote these individually but also to help one another to support the community as we seek to grow and thrive together.

This mutual accountability implies a need for all members of the Carey community to be willing to encourage and sometimes also to confront one another where an individual visibly fails to abide by the reasonable expectations for living in Christian community, and/or by the policies and guidelines expressed in the Student Handbook, Academic Catalog, or Staff Manual. It also implies a need for receptivity in which we listen and take seriously the exhortations of other members of the community. In all cases, the goal of such exchanges should be the well-being and personal and spiritual growth of the individuals involved, restoration of healthy relationships in the community, and ongoing cultivation of a robust community life which promotes the mission and values of Carey.

The procedures for addressing issues of accountability and discipline are related and similar to those for dealing with concerns and grievances, outlined above.

  1. In minor incidents where community standards are not fully respected, but where the issue is insubstantial and/or the circumstance is isolated, we trust the members of our community to exercise wisdom and maturity to hold one another accountable and to encourage the appropriate changes in behavior and interaction. It is not necessary to initiate formal action or make any report to the administration; indeed, it is understood to be inappropriate to spread unhelpful information beyond the circle of individuals who are directly affected.

  2. Where minor incidents have broader implications for the community, or where they appear to reflect an ongoing pattern, or where there is an unwillingness to address the issue and/or a need for assistance in dealing with it, it may be appropriate or necessary to involve the relevant Carey staff departments. Staff engagement may be initiated as a result of a complaint against a student brought to the relevant office, or as a result of concerns arising among the members of the staff team.

    In such cases, the appropriate staff member will approach the student privately to raise the issue, discussing it in order to gain the student’s perspective and to share that of the wider community. In most cases this will be accompanied by advice, or even by a strong recommendation or directive as to the changes needed for the student to be realigned with the expectations of community life. No formal documentation of the situation will be placed on file, though follow-up procedures may be established if the staff member believes they are needed.

    If the student and staff member are unable to reach agreement on the issue and the appropriate action to be taken, either or both may make an appeal to the appropriate Carey administrator who supervises the staff member currently involved. Normally, such an appeal will begin as a continuation of the informal accountability process. Should it become necessary, formal accountability procedures may be invoked.

  3. For significant breaches of policy or community expectations, or in cases of less serious incidents which reflect ongoing patterns or deeper concerns and which cannot be addressed informally, a formal accountability process will be implemented. The formal process is launched when the incident is reported to the appropriate area supervisor, either by a member of the community who has first-hand or reliable knowledge of the incident, or by a staff member who has been part of an informal process or who is aware of the incident and its circumstances. Such reports may be presented orally or in writing; however, the complaint must be documented in written form before formal action is undertaken. In a formal process, the concern raised, together with communication and follow-up action related to it are documented in an appropriate confidential file maintained by the relevant supervisor. The “Concerns and Grievances” form may be used for this purpose.

Formal disciplinary action is managed by the Vice President, Operations. The exact process is subject to the Vice President’s discretion and will be suited to the issue. It will involve discussion with the student whose behavior is under review, and may also include interaction with other members of the community who have been affected or who are familiar with the facts of the situation. On completion of the review, the Vice President, Operations will either determine a follow-up action, or he/she will refer the situation to an ad hoc Accountability Committee appointed by the President and Chair of the Senate and composed of members of the Carey administration and/or Senate.

Decisions rendered by the supervisor or Accountability Committee are binding, and will be included in the confidential file on the situation. Possible actions include:

  • Miscellaneous consequences – including actions such as an apology, community service, fine, loss of service, payment for damages, etc.

  • Official warning

  • Probation

  • Suspension

  • Expulsion

A student may appeal a decision made by the Vice President, Operations, in which case the appeal will go to an Accountability Committee appointed by the President and Chair of the Senate. Where an appeal is heard, the decision of the second review is final.

Institutional Integrity

Carey Theological College is committed to facilitating the learning of all students capable of doing the study and course work to the programs for which they have been accepted. Any student who has exceptionalities that may impact the full demonstration of his/her abilities should contact the Office of the Registrar to discuss evaluation and documentation of learning needs. The Carey faculty will make every effort, where it is possible and within the means of the Institution, to incorporate alternative learning strategies that have worked for the student in the past, including mutually accountable accommodations to ensure the student’s full participation in the course.

Carey’s responsibilities toward students with exceptionalities:

  • Carey will ensure that persons with exceptionalities are not denied admission based on disability.

  • Carey will accommodate students with disabilities, where possible, with respect to admission criteria and the Human Rights Code (BC) and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedom.

  • Carey will review documentation to ensure recommendations and decisions regarding accommodations are based upon appropriate medical documentation.

  • Carey will ensure, through the Office of the Registrar, that faculty are aware of individual learning plans where this is relevant to course participation and overall student learning.

  • All of the above provisions are to be done within the means of the institution. Students may need to take financial responsibilities on additional service or equipment required.

While Carey will do all possible to create a safe, supportive learning environment for all students, Carey reserves the right to deny accommodation requests if the accommodation request is deemed to have a negative impact on the quality of other student’s learning experience and the integrity of Carey curriculum.

Gender Language

As language usage changes over time, the church must discern where its own language must change in order to continue to bear witness faithfully to the gospel. Modern English usage has moved away from using masculine terms to refer to groups that include women. The continued use of such terms in worship, writing, or conversation miscommunicates the invitation of the gospel and the nature of the church.

This policy refers to humankind. Examples of inclusive language for persons can be found in the NRSV and the TNIV translations. In regards to Scripture texts, the integrity of the original expressions and names of God should be respected. The language of previous eras and other authors need not be rewritten to conform to contemporary usage. It is expected that inclusive language will be used in written work, publications, and classroom conversation at Carey Theological College.

Non-Academic Grievance Matters

Carey Theological College is committed to uphold the standards as a Christian community according to the Christian Scripture. As members of the community, Carey students are expected to respect the rights of all students, faculty and staff and adhere to the policies.

If a student has observed a violation of Carey policy or the applicable laws, or feels harmed by another student’s misconduct (e.g. affecting his/her welfare, property, safety or security) he/she should file a report with the Office of the Registrar and/or UBC Police as appropriate. A policy-procedure document and form pertaining to non-academic concerns and grievances is available on the website or from the Office of the Registrar.

Carey makes every effort to provide a safe, enjoyable, positive learning environment for all students. Nevertheless, we recognize that in a fallen world populated by imperfect men and women, situations may sometimes arise where members of our community are concerned, dissatisfied, or where they feel threatened or come into conflict. In all cases, it is our desire that students find healthy resolution to such issues, and that they feel safe in approaching staff and faculty for assistance.

Concerns and grievances come in varying degrees, and different strategies may be needed to resolve them.

  1. Matters of a minor sort, and those that can be addressed without the assistance of any formal procedures on Carey’s part are entrusted to the wisdom and mature efforts of our students, staff, and faculty.
  2. Matters that are relatively minor, where some assistance from staff, faculty, or administration is desirable or necessary, but where there is no wish or need to engage in a formal action, may be addressed by bringing forward an informal grievance or expression of concern.
    The appropriate steps for addressing an informal grievance follow the principles for dispute resolution laid out in Mat 18:15-20.
    1. Begin by discussing the concern or complaint with the person involved—in a constructive and respectful manner.
    2. If the concern is not adequately addressed in this way, speak with the individual who is responsible for the area where the concern rests: the Office of the Registrar if the issue relates to another student, or the relevant Vice President responsible for the area where the issue arises if it relates to faculty and staff.
    3. Issues that cannot be resolved in this way, or that involve multiple aspects of the Carey community should be directed to the President.

    Most suggestions for institutional improvement would also be “informal” in nature. Again, these should be directed either to the staff/faculty member to whom they are most directly relevant, or to the individual responsible for the area concerned.

  3. Where an informal process does not successfully address a grievance, or in the case of a serious conflict or problem, students may lodge a formal grievance or expression of concern, which will result in formal action by the Carey administration. (Formal action includes maintaining an official record of the issue and proceedings.)
    Normally, formal grievances fall into one of the following categories:
    1. Interpersonal issues, and issues relating to campus life or community experience should be taken up initially with the Office of the Registrar.
    2. Academic issues should be raised with the Office of the Registrar.
    3. Issues of harassment should be directed to the Office of the Registrar. Should this represent a conflict of interest or be otherwise impracticable, such issues should be raised with the Vice President, Finance and Capital Projects.

More information on the process for each type of formal action, including appeal procedures, will be provided in cases where a process is initiated.

A “Concerns and Grievances” form is available on the Carey website and/or from the Office of the Registrar.

Carey welcomes all thoughtful, respectful expressions of concern, as well as suggestions for making our programs more effective and more satisfying for the community. When students speak freely, we seek to listen carefully, in order to grow institutionally.

Matters of discipline are managed by the Office of the Registrar. Please consult with the Office of the Registrar if you desire help with these matters.

Discrimination and Harassment Policy

Carey seeks to be a community in which students, faculty and staff can grow together, free from discrimination and harassment. We are identified by our commitment to Jesus Christ and to the Scriptures which make Him known. Our purpose is that the members of Carey lead exemplary and honorable lives, consistent with and faithful to this revelation. So it is that we seek to love, honor, serve, guide and, where we have failed, seek to make and be made right with one another. We acknowledge that we sometimes fail to live up to the high ideals upon which we claim to rest. Relationships may be fractured through acts or attitudes that intentionally or unintentionally cause hurt. Discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, are two of many possible ways in which this sense of Christian community may be betrayed.

The commitment of the College to all its members is to ensure that no form of sexual harassment be tolerated, a zero-tolerance policy. Anyone who believes that he or she has been subjected to comment or conduct which might constitute discrimination or harassment should report it to the Registrar, or, in the case of a conflict of interest, to the President’s Office.

Privacy Policy

https://www.iubenda.com/privacy-policy/7883032

Student Resources

ID Cards

Upon request, student ID cards may be provided to all students who have been accepted into a for-credit program of study, and who are currently enrolled in a course. (UBC U-Pass cards are not available to Carey students.) Please remember to upload a current picture to your Populi profile to assist us with this.

Current Carey students are also eligible to receive a UBC library card, providing borrowing privileges as well as access to UBC online databases and resources.

Student Data Systems Access (Populi)

Student records managed by the Office of the Registrar are contained in a web-based electronic database system called Populi. Other information managed by the Registrar, such as course scheduling and student accounts, are also located in the Populi system. Carey has opted to use a web-based data management system so that you can have easier and more direct access to your academic records and related services. Through Populi you can:

  • Review your course history
  • Use the “grad audit” function to see at a glance what requirements you still need to meet for graduation
  • Check your student financial accounts
  • See what courses are currently scheduled for upcoming semesters
  • Register for courses
  • Pay student account balances
  • Order transcripts

These and other related functions all become available to you once you are admitted to a program and set up with a username and password. The Office of the Registrar can also help you with requests and information, but many of the services traditionally provided by contacting the office are now available to you directly at your own convenience.

Assistance with initial login and system access will be provided by the Office of the Registrar when you are admitted. Our team will also provide an orientation to Populi and helpful advice on using the system as part of new student orientation.

As an active student, we encourage you to login to Populi regularly. This will not only help you to become comfortable with the system, but it also means you’ll keep up with the information, news, etc., posted regularly on the Populi newsfeed.

UBC Learning Management System Access (Canvas)

All Carey courses are supported by the UBC Learning Management System (LMS) Canvas. This system is obviously an essential feature in our online courses, where the class is managed largely or entirely over the internet.

For Carey students, it is essential that you become familiar with and skilled in using Canvas. UBC offers a variety of training opportunities on the system. (Please note that general tech support is all managed through UBC.)

To gain access to Canvas you will need to register for a UBC Campus Wide Login (CWL) account. To do this:

  1. Create a CWL Account. Click here to begin: https://www.cwl.ubc.ca/SignUp/cwlsubscribe/SelfSubscribeIndex.do When the login screen opens, click “Proceed” to begin. Follow the prompts through the screens:
    1. UBC Privacy Policy page. You must click “I Agree” in order to continue.
    2. Select “BASIC ACCOUNT” and click “Continue”.
    3. Personal Information page. Fill in your information and choose a username, password, and security question answers. Make sure to write down this information as it is required to access your course.
  2. Activate your CWL Account. Look for an email from UBC IT Services to confirm your CWL. You have 72 hours to click the link and activate your account.
  3. Enter your CWL username in the personal information page in your Carey Populi account.

Once you have logged in to Canvas, your courses will appear as links to be followed. Note that courses are typically not available for full access until a few days before the course begins.

Traditional Library Services

Our UBC campus location makes it easy for students who come to campus to visit other libraries in the vicinity, including the John Richard Allison Library at Regent, the H. R. McMillan Library at Vancouver School of Theology, the St Mark’s College Library, and any of the UBC libraries. The staff at each library will be happy to welcome you and to assist you.

Note, however, that access to the libraries is not the same as having borrowing privileges at each. For many years, Carey students had full borrowing rights at the Regent library, which Carey operated jointly with Regent. A change in organizational relationship in summer of 2017 means that this is no longer the case. Carey students wishing to borrow Chinese-language materials will still be granted free library cards at Regent. Other students will have to obtain their own community borrower’s card if you wish to take books out of the library.

Carey Theological College students do have free borrowing privileges at the UBC Libraries. Carey maintains an updated student list at the library, including all students who have been accepted into a credit program and who are actively taking courses. You can obtain a UBC library card from the carding office at the UBC Bookstore with your Carey student ID.

UBC’s Inter-Library Loan service is available to students to obtain books or resources not already available. Books need to be picked up and returned in person; the UBC library will not mail items to students. Journal articles requested through ILL will be emailed to students. For help obtaining items not available through the ILL process, such as articles only in print format, contact a UBC Librarian for assistance.

Students who do not live near UBC are encouraged to check with their local colleges, universities, and seminaries. UBC Library participates in reciprocal borrowing agreements at many university libraries throughout Canada. Refer here for details on reciprocal borrowing privileges in Canada: http://services.library.ubc.ca/borrowing-services/reciprocal-borrowing/

To use reciprocal borrowing, students need a COPPUL (Council of Prairie and Pacific University Libraries) card. Contact David Harakal at david.harakal@ubc.ca or phone 604-822-1443 to have a COPPUL card mailed to you. You must provide your UBC student number and other contact information.

Online Library Resources

Online research resources are an increasingly important element in all forms of higher education; they are particularly vital for Carey classes which are offered in hybrid and online format. Two major resources are available to you as a Carey student.

The first is our EBSCO eBook collection. Carey is building an online library of eBooks for theological study in collaboration with EBSCO—one of the largest and most important suppliers of online resources for research libraries. At present we have subscribed to a major collection called “EBSCO eBooks Religion,” containing approximately 7,000 volumes, more than 6,000 of which are directly related to religion, theology, and biblical studies. In addition, we have begun to purchase individual eBooks which are strategically important for our classes and for student and faculty research. Our goal is to develop a useful, high-quality library of eBooks to support our learning community in the years to come. A Quick Guide to these resources are made available on our website and through the Office of the Registrar, providing specific information on how to login to the system and to make use of it.

Carey students also have access to online research databases and academic (and other) journals, which are an essential resource for all graduate students. A number of standard electronic databases (including the EBSCO database, which uses the same interface as our eBook collection) are available to you through UBC. Once you have obtained your UBC library card, these can be accessed from off campus. They can be accessed while on-campus whether or not you have a UBC library card. They will connect you to eBooks in the UBC collection, and to a broad selection of full-text electronic journals including journals in biblical, theological, religious, and social science studies. Similar databases are available at the Regent and VST libraries, though you will need to access them locally through portals in our neighbor schools’ libraries.

Relevant databases include: ATLA Religion Database with ATLASerials, Catholic Periodical and Literature Index, Christian Periodical Index, New Testament Abstracts (NTA), Old Testament Abstracts (OTA), ProQuest Religion Database, and Religious and Theological Abstracts (RTA).

Textbooks

Where possible, Carey faculty are encouraged to utilize textbooks that are available in digital form to ensure accessibility and to reduce cost. Books may be borrowed from libraries, as mentioned above.

Textbooks and other course-specific resources are an essential component of the learning process. Students are expected to obtain required textbooks for each course. These are a notable expense costing up to $150 per course. If finances are limited, students are advised to invest carefully in those essential reference works that will become a permanent and valued part of their library.

Books may be obtained through local or on-line bookstores. Carey does not operate a bookstore; however the nearby Regent Bookstore at 5800 University Blvd., Vancouver is operated as a service to students and the public. The bookstore has many texts in stock and can secure titles upon order. (Email: bookstore@regent-college.edu, Phone 1-800-334-3279.)

Academic Advising

The key information sources for making wise academic plans are all available to you through the Carey website and related resource venues in Populi. The primary tools you will need are the Academic Catalog, your personal academic records (located in Populi), and projected course schedules (in Populi and also posted on the website). The Office of the Registrar has also set up degree audit within Populi to help you determine program requirements and which courses will fulfil those requirements.

If you need help with anything relating to your program and plan—advice about course selection, resolution to problems, approval for special requests, etc.—please feel free to contact the Office of the Registrar. For advice that is specifically academic or professional in nature, and to explore the possibility of course substitutions or guided studies, you should also consider beginning by connecting the Office of the Registrar. Special requests and approvals may also need to be processed by the Office of the Registrar.

Standardized forms to simplify the process of applying for transfer credit, advanced standing, guided study courses, and course substitutions are online in Populi. Other requests should be directed, in writing, to the Office of the Registrar at registrar@carey-edu.ca.

Useful Forms

Financial Aid/Payment Plan Application: At Carey Theological College, we understand that seminary study represents a significant commitment—in time and energy as well as financial resources. We are pleased that we are able to offer a variety of financial aid resources to help reduce the expense associated with study. To apply for Financial Aid for the 2021-2022 academic year, fill out the 2021-2022 Financial Aid Application Form and submit it by the late registration deadline of the intended term. Make sure you have carefully read through our Financial Aid page and understand the relevant policies and rules. Payment plan is available upon request. Please fill out the 2021-2022 Payment Plan Application Form if you require assistance this way.

Transfer/Shared Credits, Advanced Standing and Exemptions: Students with previous theological training from a recognized institution may be eligible to receive some credit toward their program of study at Carey. Before starting the application, please read through the relevant policies on Carey’s Academic Catalogue (pp.34-36). When you’re ready to apply, fill out the Transfer/Shared Credits, Advanced Standing and Exemptions Application Form. The evaluation process will take approximately 1-2 weeks upon receipt of your application and payment.

Withdrawal/Leave of Absence: Students who wish to withdraw from a course must first submit a Withdrawal Form; Students who do not complete 6 credits of coursework within two sequential academic years will be classified as inactive. In order to retain active student status within the degree program, students must apply for a leave of absence by submitting the Leave of Absence Application Form.

Change of Specialization/Program: Students who wish to change their streams of study or switch to a different Master’s program (excluding MDiv) from another Master’s program can do so by submitting the Program Switch Application Form.

Apply for Graduation: All Carey students must apply for graduation prior to receiving official transcripts and diplomas by submitting an Graduation Application Form. This notifies the Registrar’s Office of your intention to graduate and allows us to conduct an audit of your program history to verify your eligibility.

Letter of Permission (TBC)